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Are human brain processes, like intuition, creativity, imagination and the ability to create art, computable processes?

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    $\begingroup$ I... don't think I'd say that the ability to create new algorithms is necessarily algorithmic, since the term "algorithmic" sounds to me like it would involve a fixed, standard "recipe". I'd personally say that algorithms may be created algorithmically (by algorithms), but they may also be created in ways I would not describe as "algorithmic" (but more... almost an art? imagination? intuition? I dont know, I feel like we dont have sufficiently strong definitions for these words). @DukeZhou We're currently working on a related system named Ludii :) $\endgroup$ – Dennis Soemers Jan 22 at 20:57
  • $\begingroup$ Not quite an answer, but I recall a paper (I forgot the detailed methods) that demonstrated that random object naming (name as many different dogs species as fast you can) behaved like a random walk on WordNet! $\endgroup$ – k.c. sayz 'k.c sayz' Apr 20 at 23:15
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    $\begingroup$ A proper answer would probably say "we don't know" or "clarify what you mean by algorithm" $\endgroup$ – k.c. sayz 'k.c sayz' Apr 20 at 23:16
  • $\begingroup$ @ k.c.sayz'k.csayz' """clarify what you mean by algorithm" "" : computation $\endgroup$ – alamata Oct 10 at 20:20
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    $\begingroup$ @alamata computation is more ill-defined than algorithm. an algorithm is, roughly, any finitely decidable procedure of logical operations. again the notion of "computation" is trickier to define: you could say that a rock is computing the identity function, you just need some consistent "interpretation" of the rock's computation. Brian Cantwell Smith also notes this: that you need some "decidable interpretation" of the world before you can decide over it using logical operations, which means that we can't naively call cognitive processes algorithms unless such an interpretation emerges. $\endgroup$ – k.c. sayz 'k.c sayz' Oct 11 at 1:14
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The answer to this question can be very subjective and depends upon the situation. Scenario 1: When we were toddlers, we learnt a new language(our mother tongue) automatically just by listening to the people around us talking. We did not have to put much of any efforts into this. A similar situation is, when we practice something, we tend to get faster and more accurate in that than before, automatically. Scenario 2: When we think about something creative, or make some decision, we don't always follow a defined way, and can even come up with ideas which was not there before.

In short, processing of human brain is as complex as it can get. Defining any process algorithmic, puts a strong bound on it's scope, and the working of brain is way beyond than that.

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    $\begingroup$ Algorithms can be arbitrarily complex. I don't think that the algorithmic view of the brain is necessarily limiting, unless proven otherwise. $\endgroup$ – nbro Apr 20 at 20:08

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