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Classical logic is an important part of university curriculum. It is about the distinction between zero and one and is useful to get a deeper understanding how a computer is working. If a student becomes familiar with boolean tables they can calculate for example that 1 $\land$ 0 is equal to 0. In certain programming languages, the byte datatype consists of 1 byte which contains 8 bit and each of them can have the values 0 or 1. Such information can be explained very well to students. If someone hasn't understood the concept, they can ask and the teacher will explain it again.

The principle in higher education is, that assured knowledge of the world is taught. The students can profit from it, and are able to build systems in the real world. They can use their knowledge about 0 and 1 to write software. The underlying mathematics which is logic, boolean algebra and analysis helps the student to pass exams and be prepared for future challenges at work.

Fuzzy logic contradicts the principles of higher education. It is published in predatory journals which are not working with quality standards and have no peer-review. It is located outside the scientific community. Is it possible to integrate fuzzy knowledge into the normal curriculum? Will the students profit from uncertainty?

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    $\begingroup$ I don't quite agree with your final paragraph. There are plenty of books and other resources about fuzzy logic. $\endgroup$ – Oliver Mason Jan 31 at 11:48
  • $\begingroup$ I would also agree with Mason. There are several legitimate IEEE journals and conferences which still research fuzzy logic. Although I'd agree it's not to the extent of many other fields. $\endgroup$ – juicedatom Jan 31 at 13:47
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The students would certainly profit from academic courses on making decisions in an uncertain world. However, today most scholars prefer to use the theory of probability towards achieving that goal. Fuzzy logic can be useful, but probability is better.

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  • $\begingroup$ Why is probability "better"? $\endgroup$ – nbro Jan 31 at 14:11

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