1
$\begingroup$

Were there any successful attempts to replace poor guide dogs used for blind people with AI to achieve similar rate of success? I guess dogs could be easily distracted and not reliable for every situation, and it probably takes less time to train AI, than a dog.

$\endgroup$
1
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ One key difference is that dogs need to be trained on a per-instance basis, the AI algorithm only once, then copied to all devices. Right now, though, we'd better hope the AI doesn't mistake a high-sided lorry for empty sky, like the Tesla autopilot recently did. $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 9, 2016 at 9:58

1 Answer 1

4
$\begingroup$

Chieko Asakawa (wiki, TED, IBM) is a major researcher in this area, and the linked TED talk is probably a good introduction to the state of the art as of 2015. Here's a link to a 2016 paper on a smartphone navigation system.

Guide animals perform manipulation tasks as well as identification tasks, and so it's not clear if those could be replaced well at all. (A smartphone that reads a label is a great help, but a dog that knows which bottle to grab and deliver to you is probably a much better help.)

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .