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In this page it's told:

In Single Perceptron / Multi-layer Perceptron(MLP), we only have linear separability because they are composed of input and output layers(some hidden layers in MLP)

What does it mean? I thought the MLP was a non-linear classifier. Could you explain it to me?

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In Single Perceptron / Multi-layer Perceptron(MLP), we only have linear separability because they are composed of input and output layers(some hidden layers in MLP)

This is wrong.

A multi-layer perceptron (i.e. a feed-forward neural network) with non-linear activation functions can perform non-linear classification and regression. In fact, an MLP with one hidden layer with an arbitrary number of hidden nodes, each of them with a sigmoid (which is a non-linear function), can approximate any continuous function (up to an approximation error).

On the other hand, perceptrons can't do that. They perform only linear classification/regression.

I thought the MLP was a non-linear classifier.

You're right, unless the MLP only uses linear activation functions. In that case, it won't be able to perform non-linear classification/regression.

(P.S.: I suggest you always question the truth and correctness of what you read on the web, especially, on sites like Medium, as you actually did!)

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  • $\begingroup$ Is it true to say that, in a MLP the neurons in the hidden layer can use only nonlinear activation functions while the neurons in the output layer can use or a linear or a non linear activation function ? $\endgroup$
    – AleWolf
    Commented Apr 23, 2020 at 10:45
  • $\begingroup$ @AleWolf They can use linear or non-linear activation functions everywhere, in principle. $\endgroup$
    – nbro
    Commented Apr 23, 2020 at 11:18
  • $\begingroup$ But, if they use linear activation function everywhere then that particular MLP would be linear, right ? $\endgroup$
    – AleWolf
    Commented Apr 23, 2020 at 11:49
  • $\begingroup$ @AleWolf It would be linear in the sense that it would represent a straight-line. $\endgroup$
    – nbro
    Commented Apr 23, 2020 at 11:56

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