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How can we attach numerical value to the measurement of soft skill? Is there any book, site or materials that can teach me how to do this?

I want to know if there is any way we can measure soft skill as listed here and say a person has (over 100) 70% or 60% in critical thinking ability or his critical thinking ability is over 72% and be accurate with the score.

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to ai.se...I suggest you add more details to the question $\endgroup$ – DuttaA Apr 19 '18 at 13:31
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    $\begingroup$ I edited the question to add more details. $\endgroup$ – Ikechi Apr 21 '18 at 8:49
  • $\begingroup$ What about standardizing and scoring social interactions using pre and post sentiment analysis? $\endgroup$ – Bogdan Sep 15 '18 at 16:28
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I spent some time on the Future of Work in UK government. If you want to look at the impact of AI on work you need to have good definitions of soft skills that you can measure and you can track progress against.

So the definitions sometimes need to change and decomposed. Take "Coaching" from that list: there are now bots (such as Wysa.ai) that coach you. You can measure coaching as a skill by the effectiveness of the participants achieving goals.

Things really get murky when you talk about "Creativity" -- I wrote a piece on AI impact of creativity in a similar vein.

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"Soft skill" is assessed by our common sense and there is still no standardized way of assigning soft skill , however good IQ is often a good indicator of social intelligence and soft skill as well (except for savant cases).

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    $\begingroup$ Do you have any citations to back up the claim that IQ is a good indicator of social intelligence? I have heard many people claim the opposite... $\endgroup$ – Stella Biderman Sep 15 '18 at 23:45
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    $\begingroup$ "Good IQ is often a good indicator of social intelligence" Not even a little bit. You would need serious research to make that claim, and then you would have to explain why that is not the case in practice with incredibly high iq individuals, who are notoriously bad at social skills. $\endgroup$ – Joe S Oct 15 '18 at 18:17

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