2
$\begingroup$

The intelligence of the human brain is said to be a strong factor leading to human survival. The human brain functions as overseer for many functions the organism requires. Like that, the most important thing behind artificial intelligence is computers.

Robots can employ artificial intelligence systems, just as humans employ brains.

When it comes to the human brain, we are prone to make mistakes. Where as artificial intelligence is sometimes represented to the public as perfect. What is true about AI and why?

Why was our brain not created or evolved in a way that it does not make any errors? We tend to make mistakes. why?

$\endgroup$
  • 5
    $\begingroup$ Welcome to ai.se....Most assumptions you made are wrong..Like many organisms do exist without a brain..Ai does make mistakes. $\endgroup$ – DuttaA Oct 24 '18 at 6:58
  • $\begingroup$ Like AI, we make mistakes to learn. The difference is that humans are stubborn and proud...we insist on the same mistake knowing that we are wrong. $\endgroup$ – Guilherme IA Oct 24 '18 at 14:34
  • $\begingroup$ what differentiates humans from artificial beings,is not just the brain,which is complex for us to figure out the possible implementations,But it's the Soul , think about the human brain as part of human-ware $\endgroup$ – quintumnia Oct 24 '18 at 18:17
  • $\begingroup$ @DukeZhouz ,analyse the question title critically,sounds a little bit vague $\endgroup$ – quintumnia Oct 25 '18 at 16:00
  • $\begingroup$ Closed provisionally pending clarification. (Feel free to edit and resubmit!) $\endgroup$ – DukeZhou Oct 26 '18 at 0:31
5
$\begingroup$

I would like to add this as a comment to Martin Thoma's answer, but I do not have enough reputation to comment...

However, the most important point he stresses out for me is the definition of "perfect". Since the question was already tagged "philosophy", I think that the answer can be a bit philosophically here ;) The point we miss, is that there is no definition of perfectness. Just think about the silly example that is always brought up when we talk about autonomous cars: You are about to crash into a group of school kids and the AI's only chance to avoid them is by crashing into an old person. What should the AI do in order to react "perfectly"?

All action we take is based on our personal value system, so what is perfect to one person might be completely nonsense to another person. It might be possible to create an AI that always acts perfectly in terms of the value system you fitted it out with but even in this case there are some caveats like:

  • reaction time: is the system fast enough to process all available information fast enough in order to take a fast action?
  • available information: not all information might be available with the system. Do you consider it acting imperfect, if the action of the system turns out to be wrong once you posses all information about the situation, even though some information will never be available to the system (e.g. Heisenberg's principle of uncertainty)
  • and I believe this list could be continued any further

I hope that I made it clear, that in my opinion the question is ill-posed since "perfectness" in terms of an AI is an illusion.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

When it comes to the human brain, we are prone to make mistakes. Where as artificial intelligence is sometimes represented to the public as perfect. What is true about AI and why?

Anything that exists outside of fiction that can be called AI and is not trivial is not perfect.

Examples:

  • Alexa: creepy laugh - not trivial, but not perfect
  • Tic-Tac-Toe / Connect four: perfect algorithms exist, but trivial (you can create a game tree)

Why was our brain not created or evolved in a way that it does not make any errors?

The brain was not created, but evolved.

The problem is that you didn't bother to define "perfect". What does it mean to be perfect? Natural selection favors living beings which have are energy efficient. Remembering everything might be considered perfect, but it is certainly not efficient.

We tend to make mistakes because some skills - especially abstract / mathematical ones or long-term decision making are not supported by natural selection.

Another big group of traits that are not supported by natural selection are health traits which are after the age of reproduction / helping children to grow up. Specifically cancer above an age of 40.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry, but calling complex systems automatically error prone doesn't make much sense. The idea of Artificial Intelligence is to overcome this problem with newly developed automatic test-suites and self-repairing mechanism. It is correct, that humans are making errors, and that engineers are trying to build better systems which are error-free and doesn't need human intervention. $\endgroup$ – Manuel Rodriguez Oct 28 '18 at 5:46
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @ManuelRodriguez Tell me one single system that is guaranteed to be error-free and is also non-trivial. $\endgroup$ – Martin Thoma Oct 28 '18 at 6:55
  • $\begingroup$ Trustworthy Software Systems are designed with the dedicated goal to become error-free. An example implementation are Finite state-systems which can become quite large and are validated against a baseline. Another example for a formal system is an algebraic system. $\endgroup$ – Manuel Rodriguez Oct 28 '18 at 7:37
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @ManuelRodriguez "Trustworthy Software Systems are designed with the dedicated goal to become error-free." - every developer hopes his/her software is error free. Every experienced developer knows it isn't. Software which verifies correctness can currently only be applied to trivial systems. (And: Finite state systems - no matter how many states they have - are trivial. Only super limited cases can be covered by them.) $\endgroup$ – Martin Thoma Oct 28 '18 at 7:46
-1
$\begingroup$

Visit youtube, most of the videos recommended by the AI system are false positives. Now, you know AI make mistakes?

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Sarcastic answer are funny, but you could comment the question instead of making an answer, at least..... $\endgroup$ – Jérémy Blain Nov 27 '18 at 8:31
  • $\begingroup$ @JérémyBlain I answered seriously. It was a serious attempt. I answer the question completely. $\endgroup$ – SmallChess Nov 27 '18 at 8:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.