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Related Questions

Which transition will be most difficult for some who grew up in a culture where driving autonomy is a mechanism of personal expression?

Which transition will be most difficult for institutions designed around the existence of enforcement, justice, licensing, and litigation?


Possible Sequence of Transitions

Reins (for horses)
    ⇓
Steering wheels, accelerators, breaks, and signals
    ⇓
Add cruise control and anti-skid
    ⇓
Hybrid AI-manual driving
    ⇓
AV vehicle lanes on highways
    ⇓
AV safety stats prove manual driving dangerous
    ⇓
Removal of steering wheel and pedals
    ⇓
AV the norm, with diminishing manual lanes and roads
    ⇓
Elimination of driver's licenses
    ⇓
Legislation to prohibit manual driving
    ⇓
Swarm updated real time map maintenance
    ⇓
Emergence of community shared automated chauffeuring


Returning to the Main Question

What socioeconomic points of resistance do autonomous auto designers and manufacturers face?

Does the resistance have any real basis, considering the dangers of manual driving, or just the typical yet baseless fear of change?

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A heavy problem in autonomous driving is, that the underlying technology is too advanced for 99% of the world population. What a mechanical car is, is teached in schools. It contains of a motor, brakes and a human driver. And the science of building traditional cars is teached in universities under the term mechanical engineering. That means, the first group has a theoretical understanding of cars and invents new models, while the second group of people, not attended a formal education, but is assembling the cars in a manufacturing company.

If a traditional car is replaced by autonomous cars the underlying technology is changing drastically. Such a product doesn't depends on mechanical engineering but autonomous cars are the result of software engineering. Such a discipline isn't teached in universities and the number of people who are familiar with it is small. Most have learned it in the last 2 years. This makes an autonomous car to an advanced technology which isn't understood by the mainstream population. The problem isn't the car itself, the problem is to teach 7 billion people what expert systems, neural networks and compiler languages are. If this education mission fails, the introduction of autonomous cars will fail. Even if the product fulfills all technical requirements the people are in fear of it. They don't understand the software in the car and they fear the social pressure to adapt.

Suppose, a computer expert is trying to overwhelm the public. He is programming with the stack-based Forth language an Artificial Intelligence which controls the car. Forth is known as an esoteric language which is not understood by normal computer students who are familiar with Java and C++. How many people in the world are able to reprogram the Forth based autonomous vehicle? Very few, and the other will not understand what the car is doing, even if they have access to the source code. The knowledge gap would be on it's maximum.

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