Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions related to the definition of and use of terminology in the context of Artificial Intelligence

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42 views

Aren't scores in the Wasserstein GAN probabilities?

I am quite new to GAN and I am reading about WGAN vs DCGAN. Relating to the Wasserstein GAN (WGAN), I read here Instead of using a discriminator to classify or predict the probability of generated ...
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1answer
151 views

What is a “learned policy” in Q-learning?

I am completing an assignment at the moment. One of the assignment questions asks how you identified the learned policy and how you obtained it. The question is a reinforcement learning question, and ...
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What is the difference between a network framework and an architechture? [closed]

I wonder about the difference between the two terms, as they seem to be used interchangeably.
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1answer
35 views

What is the smoothness assumption in SVMs?

In this research paper, we have the following claim the smoothness assumption that underlies many kernel methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs) does not hold for deep neural networks trained ...
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1answer
37 views

Is a team of ML scientists an “intelligent agent”?

I am writing about the role of machine learning scientists in developing a solution. Is there a term for the humans who do learning? Can we call a "team of machine learning scientists with their ...
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48 views

Is my reward function non-Markovian?

I am working on an RL problem where the time when the agent obtains the reward for taking action $a$ in time step $t$ is stochastic. In fact, there is no immediate reward for taking action $a$ in time ...
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1answer
58 views

What are support values in a support vector machine?

I started reading up on SVM and very little is defined of what are support values. I reckon it's they are denoted as $\alpha$ in most formulations.
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1answer
110 views

Confusion between function learned and the underlying distribution

Let us assume that I am working on a dataset of black and white dog images. Each image is of size $28 \times 28$. Now, I can say that I have a sample space $S$ of all possible images. And $p_{data}$ ...
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1answer
59 views

In the machine learning literature, what does it mean to say that something is “embedded” in some space?

In the machine learning literature, I often see it said that something is "embedded" in some space. For instance, that something is "embedded" in feature space, or that our data ...
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1answer
44 views

What is a “codon” in grammatical evolution?

The term codon is used in the context of grammatical evolution (GE), sometimes, without being explicitly defined. For example, it is used in this paper, which introduces and describes PonyGE 2, a ...
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1answer
48 views

What is a unified neural network model?

In many articles (for example, in the YOLO paper, this paper or this one), I see the term "unified" being used. I was wondering what the meaning of "unified" in this case is.
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36 views

What is MNLI-(m/mm)?

I came across the term MNLI-(m/mm) in Table 1 of the paper BERT: Pre-training of Deep Bidirectional Transformers for Language Understanding. I know what MNLI stands for, i.e. Multi-Genre Natural ...
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1answer
91 views

What is asymmetric relaxation backpropagation?

In Chapter 8, section 8.5.2, Raul Rojas describes how the weights for a layer of a neural network can be calculated using a pseudoinverse of the sigmoid function in the nodes, he explains this is an ...
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1answer
46 views

What's the difference between architectures and backbones?

In the paper "ForestNet: Classifying Drivers of Deforestation in Indonesia using Deep Learning on Satellite Imagery", the authors talk about using: Feature Pyramid Networks (as the ...
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85 views

$\frac{P(x_1 \mid y, s = 1) \dots P(x_n \mid y, s = 1) P(y \mid s = 1)}{P(x \mid s = 1)}$ indicates that naive Bayes learners are global learners?

I am currently studying the paper Learning and Evaluating Classifiers under Sample Selection Bias by Bianca Zadrozny. In section 3. Learning under sample selection bias, the author says the following: ...
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55 views

Why are “Transformers” called this way?

What is the reason behind the name "Transformers", for Multi Head Self-Attention-based neural networks from Attention is All You Need? I have been googling this question for a long time, and ...
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1answer
25 views

What is the difference between sensitivity analysis and parameter tuning?

I tried different values of genetic algorithm operators: many crossover rates from 20% to 80% many crossover rates from 1% to 20% varying the population size The study of different parameter values ...
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1answer
44 views

What is the reason for taking tuples as vectors rather than points?

Across the literature of artificial intelligence, especially machine learning, it is normal to treat the tuples of datasets as vectors. Although there is a convention to treat them as data points. ...
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1answer
40 views

What do we mean by “infrequent features”?

I am reading this blog post: https://ruder.io/optimizing-gradient-descent/index.html. In the section about AdaGrad, it says: It adapts the learning rate to the parameters, performing smaller updates (...
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36 views

What is the formal terminology for emotion recognition AI?

I'm researching the use of emotion recognition in Intelligent Tutoring Systems and trying to more effectively find and formally reference materials. My question is whether this is the most formal ...
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839 views

What is meant by “ground truth” in the context AI?

What does "ground truth" mean in the context of AI especially in the context of machine learning? I am a little confused because I have read that the ground truth is the same as a label in ...
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2answers
227 views

What is the meaning of “exploration” in reinforcement and supervised learning?

While exploration is an integral part of reinforcement learning (RL), it does not pertain to supervised learning (SL) since the latter is already provided with the data set from the start. That said, ...
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1answer
96 views

What is a “learned emulator”?

In this article, the term "learned emulator" is used. Recently, scientists have started creating "learned emulators" using AI neural network approaches, but have not yet fully ...
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1answer
118 views

Are mult-adds and FLOPs equivalent?

I am comparing different CNN architectures for edge implementation. Some papers describing architectures refer to mult-adds, like the MobileNet V1 paper, where it is claimed that this net has 569M ...
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2answers
184 views

Why is the target called “target” in Monte Carlo and TD learning if it is not the true target?

I was going through Sutton's book and, using sample-based learning for estimating the expectations, we have this formula $$ \text{new estimate} = \text{old estimate} + \alpha(\text{target} - \text{old ...
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What is the difference between active learning and online learning?

The definitions for these two appear to be very similar, and frankly, I've been only using the term "active learning" the past couple of years. What is the actual difference between the two? ...
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1answer
93 views

What does the notation $\mathcal{N}(z; \mu, \sigma)$ stand for in statistics?

I know that the notation $\mathcal{N}(\mu, \sigma)$ stands for a normal distribution. But I'm reading the book "An Introduction to Variational Autoencoders" and in it, there is this notation:...
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1answer
46 views

Is the error function known or unknown?

What is the error function? Is it the same as the cost function? Is the error function known or unknown? When I get the outcome of a neural net I compare it with the target value. The difference ...
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1answer
61 views

What do we mean by 'principal angle between subspaces'?

I came across the term 'principal angle between subspaces' as a tool for comparing objects in images. All material that I found on the internet seems to deal with this idea in a highly mathematical ...
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1answer
47 views

What is the representational capacity of a learning algorithm? [duplicate]

The definition I see for representational capacity is "the family of functions the learning algorithm can choose from when varying the parameters in order to reduce a training objective." (...
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1answer
87 views

Who first coined the term “deep learning”?

AFAIK, deep learning became popular in 2012 with the victory of ImageNet Competition - Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge 2012 where winners of this contest actually used deep learning ...
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1answer
82 views

What is Cognitive Intelligence?

Similarly to the question, What is artificial intelligence? Cognitive Intelligence, as well as being a part of Artificial Intelligence, is an area that mainly covers the technology and tools that ...
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0answers
43 views

Does Algorithmic Mechanism Design come under the field of AI?

I see many papers in AAMAS talk about artificial intelligence and mechanism design simultaneously. I was wondering, for the sake of being pedantic, is mechanism design could be classified under AI.
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48 views

What is meant by “arranging the final features of CNN in a grid” and how to do it?

In the paper What You Get Is What You See: A Visual Markup Decompiler, the authors have proposed a method to extract the features from the CNN and then arrange those extracted features in a grid to ...
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1answer
55 views

What is meant by degrees of freedom of latent variables?

...Designing such a likelihood function is typically challenging; however, we observe that features like spectrogram are effective when latent variables have limited degrees of freedom. This motivates ...
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1answer
52 views

How can I classify policy gradient methods in RL?

In the book of Barto and Sutton, there are 3 methods presented that solve an RL problem: DP, Monte Carlo, and TD. But which category does policy gradient methods (or actor-only methods) classify in? ...
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49 views

What are the differences between backbones, frontends, models and architectures in applied deep learning?

Context I'm trying to dive into deep learning for tasks on images, and trying to figure out how to reuse some well-known structures* that have been published, mainly on github. ( *Here, structure can ...
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122 views

What is a self-learning model?

Any simple example of a self-learning model (any business use case, banking)? I have found the terms here and here.
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1answer
51 views

What does it mean when a model “statistically outperforms” another?

I was reading this paper where they are stating the following: We also use the T-Test to test the significance of GMAN in 1 hour ahead prediction compared to Graph WaveNet. The p-value is less than 0....
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2answers
291 views

What are the main algorithms used in computer vision?

Nowadays, CV has really achieved great performance in many different areas. However, it is not clear what a CV algorithm is. What are some examples of CV algorithms that are commonly used nowadays and ...
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3answers
893 views

What is Reinforcement Learning?

What is the cleanest, easiest way to explain someone who is a non-STEM work colleague the concept of Reinforcement Learning? What are the main ideas behind Reinforcement Learning?
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1answer
192 views

How do I recognise a bandit problem?

I'm having difficulty understanding the distinction between a bandit problem and a non-bandit problem. An example of the bandit problem is an agent playing $n$ slot machines with the goal of ...
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1answer
48 views

What are finite horizon look-ahead policies in reinforcement learning?

I was reading the paper How to Combine Tree-Search Methods in Reinforcement Learning published in AAAI Conference 2019. It starts with the sentence Finite-horizon lookahead policies are abundantly ...
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1answer
63 views

What are mono-variable and multi-variable neural networks?

In this document, the terms "Redes Neuronales estáticas monovariables" and "Redes Neuronales estáticas multivariables" are mentioned. What are mono-variable and multi-variable neural networks? Is it ...
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19 views

How do CNNs or RNNs “stack the feature of nodes by a specific order”?

I am trying to understand the following statement taken from the paper Graph Neural Networks: A Review of Methods and Applications (2019). Standard neural networks like CNNs and RNNs cannot handle ...
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3answers
157 views

What is the difference between artificial intelligence and swarm intelligence?

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to the simulation of human intelligence in machines that are programmed to think like humans and mimic their actions. The term may also be applied to any machine ...
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1answer
31 views

What are non-held-out data or non-held-out classes?

I'm Spanish and I don't understand the meaning of "non-held-out". I have tried Google Translator and online dictionaries like Longman but I can't find a suitable translation for this term. You can ...
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2answers
161 views

How can reinforcement learning be unsupervised learning if it uses deep learning?

I was watching a video in my online course where I'm learning about A.I. I am a very beginner in it. At one point in the course, the instructor says that reinforcement learning (RL) needs a deep ...
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2answers
99 views

Are bandits considered an RL approach?

If a research paper uses multi-armed bandits (either in their standard or contextual form) to solve a particular task, can we say that they solved this task using a reinforcement learning approach? Or ...
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2answers
54 views

What is meant by a multi-dimensional continuous action space?

In the context of Reinforcement Learning, what does it mean to have a multi-dimensional continuous action space? I came across the following in the COBRA Paper A method for learning a distribution ...

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