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For questions about chess playing engines such as AlphaZero and Leela, and questions about AI methods and theory related to Chess. (Questions purely about chess are off-topic but can be asked on SE:Chess.)

4
votes
MCTS for chess had been tried in the literature with little success. It was assumed AlphaGo's approach would never work on chess, maybe in Go but not in chess. … AlphaGo was running quite slow, but it played strongest chess. …
answered Feb 9 '18 by SmallChess
1
vote
Machine learning and self-learning are of course possible, and there're many successive cases! You need to know this: machines won't think like humans. Machines form a statistical model and calibrate …
answered Jul 5 '17 by SmallChess
3
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https://arxiv.org/pdf/1712.01815.pdf A move in chess may be described in two parts: selecting the piece to move, and then selecting among the legal moves for that piece. …
answered Apr 16 '18 by SmallChess
2
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In fact, I'm the developer of some mobile chess apps. … [Disclaimer] I would argue my chess engine products for the iOS (http://www.smallchess.com) are powerful and strong enough to beat any chess grandmaster. My apps run without network connection, …
answered Mar 31 '17 by SmallChess
1
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No, ALL computer chess experts were surprised about the outcomes of the match. If you require references, please start a new question. Your question is simple... … We evaluated the fully trained instances of AlphaZero against Stockfish, Elmo and the previous version of AlphaGo Zero (trained for 3 days) in chess, shogi and Go respectively, playing 100 game matches …
answered Feb 3 '18 by SmallChess
2
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Anybody who can remember all the possible board configurations in chess, by definition plays perfect chess. A perfect player would never lose. … Unfortunately, most practical problems can't be solved by brute-force, and that includes chess. All chess players learn general chess principles. …
answered Oct 25 '17 by SmallChess
2
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It's possible for an AI to learn chess without even knowing how to move the pieces. Google's AlphaZero didn't do that as their programmers coded the chess rules, but it's possible. … One can learn the rules from human played chess games. Once the rules are known, we could use reinforcement learning to improve playing strength (and other board games). …
answered Dec 12 '17 by SmallChess
1
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Your logic is flawed because you negated "stand-pat" (i.e. do nothing) and alpha-beta. Let's take a look at the pseudocode (https://www.chessprogramming.org/Quiescence_Search#Pseudo_Code): int Quiesc …
answered Jan 7 '19 by SmallChess
0
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Is this really how it works? Yes and no. An evaluation function based on pure material advantage is a perfectly legal function. It's certainly better than nothing. However, it's too simple in practi …
answered Jan 30 '21 by SmallChess