27

Yes, there is some research on this topic, which can be called adversarial machine learning, which is more an experimental field. An adversarial example is an input similar to the ones used to train the model, but that leads the model to produce an unexpected outcome. For example, consider an artificial neural network (ANN) trained to distinguish between ...


20

AI is vulnerable from two security perspectives the way I see it: The classic method of exploiting outright programmatic errors to achieve some sort of code execution on the machine that is running the AI or to extract data. Trickery through the equivalent of AI optical illusions for the particular form of data that the system is designed to deal with. ...


12

Sometimes if the rules used by an AI to identify characters are discovered, and if the rules used by a human being to identify the same characters are different, it is possible to design characters that are recognized by a human being but not recognized by an AI. However, if the human being and AI both use the same rules, they will recognize the same ...


10

Yes there are, for instance one pixel attacks described in Su, J.; Vargas, D.V.; Kouichi, S. One pixel attack for fooling deep neural networks. arXiv:1710.08864 One pixels attacks are attacks in which changing one pixel in input image can strongly affect the results.


7

Programmer vs Programmer It's a "infinity war": Programmers vs Programmers. All thing can be hackable. Prevention is linked to the level of knowledge of the professional in charge of security and programmers in application security. eg There are several ways to identify a user trying to mess up the metrics generated by Sentiment Analysis, but there are ...


6

How we can prevent it? There are several works about AI verification. Automatic verifiers can prove the robustness properties of neural networks. It means that if the input X of the NN is perturbed not more that on a given limit ε (in some metric, e.g. L2), then the NN gives the same answer on it. Such verifiers are done by: Stanford: https://arxiv.org/...


5

To answer your question, it really depends on the purpose of the Artificial Intelligence program. For example, 4Chan has hacked a number of "Artificial Intelligent" bots, most notably was Microsoft's Twitter bot Tay. The general purpose of the bot was to parse what was tweeted at it and respond in kind, learning and evolving with each and every interaction. ...


5

Here's an example: How to hack your face to dodge the rise of facial recognition tech In his recent book The Fall, Stephenson wrote about smartglasses that that project a pattern over the facial features to foil recognition algorithms (which seems not only feasible but likely;) Here's an article from our sponsors, Adversarial AI: As New Attack Vector ...


4

There are many insightful comments and answers so far. I want to illustrate my idea of "color blindness test" more. Maybe it's a hint to lead us to the truth. Imagine there are two people here. One is colorblind (AI) and another one is non-colorblind (human). If we show them a normal number "6", both of them can easily recognize it as number 6. Now, if we ...


4

Isn't that essentially what chess does? For example, A human can recognize that a Ruy exchange offers white great winning chances (because of pawn structure) by move 4 while an engine would take several hours of brute force calculation to understand the same idea.


4

Is Artificial Intelligence Vulnerable to Hacking? Invert your question for a moment and think: What would make AI at less of a risk of hacking compared to any other kind of software? At the end of the day, software is software and there will always be bugs and security issues. AIs are at risk to all the problems non-AI software is at risk to, being AI ...


4

I believe it is, no system is safe, however I am not sure if I can still say this after 20-30 years of AI development/evolution. Anyways, there are articles that showed humans fooling AI (Computer Vision). https://www.theverge.com/2018/1/3/16844842/ai-computer-vision-trick-adversarial-patches-google https://spectrum.ieee.org/cars-that-think/transportation/...


3

However, do industrial strength, production ready defensive strategies and approaches exist? Are there known examples of applied adversarial-resistant networks for one or more specific types (e.g. for small perturbation limits)? I think it's difficult to tell whether or not there are any industrial strength defenses out there (which I assume would mean that ...


3

Here's a live demo: https://www.labsix.org/physical-objects-that-fool-neural-nets/ Recall that neural nets are trained by feeding in the training data, evaluating the net, and using the error between the observed and the intended output to adjust the weights and bring the observed output closer to the intended. Most attacks have been on the observation that ...


3

When someone is able to do a causative attack it means there is a mechanism by which they are able to input data into the network. Maybe a website where people can input their images and it outputs a guess on what is in the picture and then you click if it got it right or not. If you continue to input images and lie to it it will obviously get worse and ...


3

Not necessarily it depends on the function of the problem space for both the GANs. A real world example: a batter's reaction time and a pitchers max speed are actual bounded values based on genetics and physics. If the max speed a pitcher can pitch is greater than the max reaction time a human needs to effectively hit against them they will permanently be ...


2

I don't have a proper source for this, as i've only read this from an online forum: everything i say is just hearsay and I am very uneducated on the subject. With that being said... As you may know algorithmic trading relies on strategies, i.e. I trade a certain way once I see certain indexes move in a certain way. If your procedure is known by other ...


2

There are some research at least on the "foolability" of neural networks, that gives insight on potential high risk of neural nets even when they "seem" 99.99% acurate. A very good paper on this is in Nature: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03013-5 In a nutshell: It shows diverse exemples of fooling neural networks/AIs, for exemple one where a ...


1

Not necessarily. Supposing your data is from the distribution of possible images containing an upright person close to the camera. Something like a neural network would perform poorly on the new data since it comes from a distribution other than on what it was trained. You could try augmenting the dataset to try to get some synthetic "far away upside down ...


1

A robust ML model is one that captures patterns that generalize well in the face of the kinds of small changes that humans expect to see in the real world. A robust model is one that generalizes well from a training set to a test or validation set, but the term also gets used to refer to models that generalize well to, e.g. changes in the lighting of a ...


1

They don't have acces to the original training or test dataset. Machine learning environments are build on the premise of a benign environment. The models are trained on real data (real inputs). When someone sends a made up input (fake input) it is very easy to fool the model. This is used for example in image recognition. Imagine a fotograph of a panda. ...


1

Perhaps what you are looking for is the notion of adversarial attacks on machine learning systems?


1

Everything can be hacked. The solutions found by artificial intelligence can be much more efficient than human solutions, but they can also be confused because of the diversity and immensity of details that our mind possesses. Artificial Intelligence models bring us more secure solutions, but nothing is 100% safe when we talk about information security. ...


1

Intelligence of any type is vulnerable to hacking, whether DNA based or artificial. First, let's define hacking. In this context, hacking is the exploitation of weaknesses to gain specific ends which may include status, financial gain, disruption of business or government, information that can be used for extortion, the upper hand in a business deal or ...


1

Is artificial intelligence vulnerable to hacking? hint; if you say that AI is vulnerable,then I disagree with you here by such statement. Artificial intelligence is divided into three categories nor phases that we are supposed to go through ie. artificial narrow intelligence artificial general intelligence artificial super intelligence Therefore,according ...


1

I concur with Akio that no system is completely safe, but the take away is AI systems are less prone to attacks when comparing with the old systems because of the ability to constantly improve. As time passes by more people will get in the field bringing new ideas and hardware will be improving so that they are "strong AI."


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