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It might be of note to comment/update that the SuperGLUE benchmark, which is a suite of common sense reasoning tasks, incorporates the aforementioned Winnograd Schema challenge, among other tests that are said to be reflective of natural language understanding (as opposed to simply its processing or the optimal statistical generation of language). The most ...


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To avoid a repetitive answer that has been already spoken about such as absurdly high iterative ability or it being able to create another AGI system and multiplying or anything sci-fi like - there is one line of thought I feel people do not speak enough about. Our human senses are extremely limited i.e. we can see objects only when light from within the ...


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Direct Answer to Your Question:-- Google uses the term: Automated Machine Learning. What this Answer is About:-- " ... A general AI x creates another AI y which is better than x. ... " ~ Ashwin Rohit (Stack Exchange user, Opening Poster) What is the term for this: "A.I. creating A.I."? - What is some theory behind this:-- "The AutoML procedure has ...


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The first thing that comes to mind when reading your question is Genetic algorithms. They create alternate versions of themselves and measure each versions performance on a specific task, before discarding those that work poorly, while keeping the best ones for their next generation. The mutations here are often random, and for large/complex problems, these ...


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I don't think there is a single standard word or phrase that covers just this concept. Perhaps recursive self-improvement matches the idea concisely - but that is not specific AI jargon. Very little is understood about what strength this effect can have or what the limits are. Will 10 generations of self-improvement lead to a machine that is 10% better, 10 ...


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John Doucette's answer covers my thoughts on this pretty well, but I thought a concrete example might be interesting. I work on a symbolic AI called Cyc, which represents concepts as a web of logical predicates. We often like to brag that Cyc "understands" things because it can elucidate logical relationships between them. It knows, for example, that people ...


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Humans certainly don't understand infinity. Currently computers cannot understand things that humans cannot because computers are programmed by humans. In a dystopian future that may not be the case. Here are some thoughts about infinity. The set of natural numbers is infinate. It has also been proved that the set of prime numbers, which is a subset of ...


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Well -- just to touch on the question of people and infinity -- my father has been a mathematician for 60 years. Throughout this time, he's been the kind of geek who prefers to talk and think about his subject over pretty much anything else. He loves infinity and taught me about it from a young age. I was first introduced to the calculus in 5th grade (not ...


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I think the property humans have which computers do not, is some sort of parallel process that runs alongside every other thing they are thinking and tries to assign an importance weighting evaluation to everything you are doing. If you ask a computer to run the program : A = 1; DO UNTIL(A<0) a=a+1; END; The computer will. If you ask a human, ...


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Its arguable if we humans understand infinity. We just create new concept to enplace old mathematics when we meet this problem. In division by infinity machine can understand it the same way as we: double* xd = new double; *xd =...; if (*xd/y<0.00...1){ int* xi = new int; *xi = (double) (*xd); delete xd; If human thinks of infinity - imagines just huge ...


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