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I don’t know for certain, but I can make a guess. This is just my opinion, some others may disagree. The field of ALife has four branches that I’m aware of: Self-Organizing/self assembly behavior. This is the application you refer to, another context it’s useful is swarm control (for drone swarms, for example). While this is technically ALife, as far as I’m ...


4

"Life" is a definition humans use to classify objects according to the types of behavior humans perceive as unique to living creatures. Scientists and philosophers tend to define something as "alive" if it manifests some specific properties found in living organisms, such as self-replication, adaptation to the environment, homeostasis and ...


4

If you read Steven Levy's book, Artificial Life,you will find, as I did, the distinction between biological and "artificial" life blurred. If you think about it, what exactly is "life", anyway? A set of complex systems with emergent behavior capable of evolution and adaptation. A prototypical biologist may not define life that way. Indeed, he would, not ...


4

AFAIK, pain is produced by the nervous system (after the realease of chemicals), so no AI suffers. AI does not (yet) possess a life (and I don't think this will ever happen). A definition of life from the dictionary: the condition that distinguishes animals and plants from inorganic matter, including the capacity for growth, reproduction, functional ...


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Yes it has been tried. In fact there is a whole field, dubbed Genetic Programming. There is an annual competition to obtain "Human-Competitive" algorithms, and many instances of those have been found over the years.


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I like to take an "animist" approach. (It has been suggested to me that part of the reason Japanese designs are so effective is because of the cultural affinity for the concept per the Shinto tradition. For instance, the thing where people put little eyes on everything;) I like to think of how my dog, who is terrified of the vacuum cleaner, would regard ...


2

Image recognition is an important application of AI techniques, as images usually act as sensory input for further problems to be solved. For example, a self-driving car needs to take into account its environment; it needs to recognise the path/road it is driving on, obstacles, other traffic, traffic signs, etc. All this is visual input which needs to be ...


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You do not always need an explictly coded fitness function to perform genetic algorithm searches. The more general need is for a selection process that favours individuals that perform better at the core tasks in an environment (i.e. that are "more fit"). One way of assessing performance is to award a numerical score, but other approaches are ...


2

Wikipedia describes life as a characteristic of "physical entities having biological processes". The same source also describes a simulation as "the imitation of the operation of a real-world process or system over time." If a digital neural net was to listen to me prattle on for long enough it could learn to speak as if it were me. It would have my ...


1

It is entirely possible! You see, the agents will perform whatever actions are available to them, and if the evolutionary algorithm is setup correctly, whatever set of actions provides them with a bigger survival rate will be the one that gets explored and reproduced the most. Here is a very interesting list of "Specification Gaming" in AI, where ...


1

How can you assess the quality of any solution without a measure of quality, which, in the context of genetic algorithms, is known as fitness function? The term fitness function is due to the well-known phrase "Survival of the Fittest", which is often used to describe the Darwinian theory of natural selection (which genetic algorithms are based on)....


1

Imho, it is life. Example: consider the possibility that we synthesized from completethe DNA of a human being, with zero atoms from another human, and grew said human in a lab. Most (and myself) would agree that creature is alive. Although there are many opinions that differ, my own is that there is no absolute line to draw between something that is ...


1

It wouldn't be considered alive if it doesn't have vital functions, such as nutrition, relation with the environment, and reproduction. While the first is easy (use a battery) and the second is the one we are developing right now (basically, the intelligence part of an AI) giving programming skills to an AI, aka the ability to reproduce, isn't widely ...


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