15 votes
Accepted

Why is reinforcement learning not the answer to AGI?

Some AI researchers do think RL is a path to AGI, and your intuition about how an agent would need to be proactive in selecting actions to learn about is exactly the area these researchers are now ...
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14 votes

How does one prove comprehension in machines?

This is one of the most important issues in the philosophy of artificial intelligence. The most famous philosophical argument that attempts to address this issue is the Chinese Room argument ...
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  • 34.5k
9 votes

Does the Chinese Room argument hold against AI?

It depends on the definition of (artificial) intelligence. The position that Searle originally tried to refute with the Chinese room experiment was the so-called position of strong AI: An ...
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  • 1,461
8 votes

Does the Chinese Room argument hold against AI?

There are two broad types of responses to philosophical queries like this. The first is to make analogies and refer to intuition; one could, for example, actually calculate the necessary size for ...
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6 votes

Does the Chinese Room argument hold against AI?

First of all, for a detailed view of the argument, check out the SEP entry on the Chinese Room. I consider the CRA as an indicator of you definition of intelligence. If the argument holds, yes, the ...
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  • 536
5 votes

How does one prove comprehension in machines?

I recently came across a neat definition of understanding in Roger Schank's Dynamic Memory: Basically, you store everything you experience in your memory, but you need to index it in order to be able ...
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  • 5,072
5 votes

Why is reinforcement learning not the answer to AGI?

A relatively recent but interesting paper that discusses this topic in more detail is Reward is enough (Artificial Intelligence, 2021) by David Silver, Satinder Singh, Doina Precup, and Richard S. ...
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4 votes
Accepted

Why is the Chinese Room argument such a big deal?

If you check the Wikipedia article on the argument that you linked, in the History section, you'll note the following statement: Most of the discussion consists of attempts to refute it. I think ...
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3 votes

Does the Chinese Room argument hold against AI?

Depends on who you ask! John Searle, who proposed this argument, would say "yes", but others would say it is irrelevant. The Turing Test does not stipulate that a machine must actually "understand" ...
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3 votes
Accepted

What are examples of thought experiments against or in favour of strong AI, apart from the Chinese room argument?

An excellent book summarizing the development of thought in this area over several hundred years is Mind Design II, edited by John Haugeland. This book contains a collection of essays written by the ...
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3 votes

What are the implications of the statement "If you can't tell, does it matter?" in relation to AI?

The question in this video is Are you real? What does this question really mean? Is the guy asking whether the apparent female (I don't know if she is a cyborg or not because I did not yet watch the ...
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1 vote

Is the Cognitive Approach (SOAR) equivalent to the Chinese Room argument?

Searle's Chinese room is analogical and is intended to present an easy-to-understand picture of the essential elements and processes of the digital computer. In the room the man (CPU) has a book of ...
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  • 161
1 vote

Why is the Chinese Room argument such a big deal?

The Chinese room argument is such a big deal because it takes the concept of the Turing machine and Turing's conception of the electronic digital computer (so-called) as a practical version of the ...
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  • 161
1 vote

Is there a formal name for this philosophical AI problem?

Your problem closely resembles John Searle's "Chinese Room" argument, which claimed that one (or more) abstract "intelligence tests" lack the discriminitive ability to distinguish between a trivial ...
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1 vote

Is there a formal name for this philosophical AI problem?

If something is indistinguishable from a human it is as intelligent as a human. There is no such thing as simulated intelligence. Consciousness of course is a different matter and I suspect that's ...
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