10

I quite like your outlook, and without getting into the details of how a "singularity" may be effected which is covered in numerous other questions, or how consciousness and "omniscience" come into play because consciousness and omniscience are not requirements, I will instead direct you to two key philosophers: Phillip K. Dick, for whom the central theme ...


6

AI is already connected with cognitive psychology - there are dozens of AIs right this minute attempting to predict things like which Facebook posts you will like, and which ads you are most likely to click on. In other words, they are trying to predict how you think. For more detailed info on this AI/cognitive science connection, there is some suggested ...


3

Can a brain be intelligent without a body? No. Don't forget that the main function of the brain is to provide homeostasis between the body and the environment. Without the body, the utility of the brain is no longer relevant. Alternatively, why consider intelligence only in the brain? How far does our body extend? Embodied cognitive science asks us to ...


3

I think you are slightly confusing 2 problems. 1 being classification of meta visual elements and the other being the visual system itself. Our visual system, when it comes to processing information, has had billions of years of iteration(training), so that at birth(and before), we are already tuned for the processing of visual stimuli, as well as have the ...


3

Human intelligence is very general / broad in its scope. This is self-evident, and whatever AI ends up to be, we'd like it to be a general problem solver as well (cf. Simon and Newell). Taking liberal interpretations of your question... Why AI in a computer? Computers, to the extent that we can frame problems in general as a solvable computational ...


3

Another impression that I get is that cognitive science is more about trying to find out how the human intelligence or mind works. And that it would use artificial intelligence to make tests or experiments, to test ideas and so forth. I think that's pretty much it. I mean, clearly there is some overlap, but I feel like most people who use "cognitive ...


3

No, here is why. No approach can simulate the mind with 100% accuracy. a major notion that AI theorist refuse to note is that you cant take an orange and by virtue of technology turn it into an apple lets apply the same logic here. neurons are temporary things in our brains, daily we are trimming our brains and growing our brains, in order to "Engineer" a ...


2

There has been a lot of research in cognitive science on the relationship of sleep/dreaming and memory/learning. I don't know enough about the subject to say if it resembles backprop in spirit, by as the BlindKungFuMaster points out, that may be corollary. Here's a paper from 2004, Memory Consolidation in Sleep: Dream or Reality?, which concludes that "...


2

This is a very interesting question and also an important one for AI. All the current Deep Learning successes are built on the effectiveness of backprop, so what if it doesn't play a role in the only examples of intelligence currently around? It makes a lot of sense for the brain to employ some form of backprop, because that would allow it to create low-...


2

I don’t think AI is simulating the brain functions and not even close. Do you know how the nervous system work? How the neutrons transmit signals with action potential? Pathway analysis? Splicing junctions? AI is not about simulating the brain at all. We don’t simulate the biology pathway, we don’t simulate alternative splicing, we don’t have proteins in ...


2

It depends what you mean by intelligence. A robot that acts has a different sort of intelligence than a neural net that merely maps inputs to outputs. Bit patterns within a robot brain have meaning, whereas the meaning of the inputs and outputs of gain meaning only through the larger system in which humans steer input data to it, and act on the basis of the ...


1

Searle's Chinese room is analogical and is intended to present an easy-to-understand picture of the essential elements and processes of the digital computer. In the room the man (CPU) has a book of intructions (program) for responding to Chinese input questions. That is just one program of many possible programs the room could run. Each different program ...


1

This is about hard AI and soft AI: proponents of hard AI work on systems that simulate the way human cognition works, with the eventual (hypothetical) goal of replicating it. This presupposes that you know how cognition works, and presumably you will learn about it as you attempt to replicate it. Soft AI, on the other hand, tries to emulate the outcomes ...


1

Can a brain be intelligent without a body? If you define "intelligence" as "doing the right thing at the right time", then the statement itself implies some sort of embodied context, whether humanoid, networked or otherwise. If you have a more existential definition where by fact that there are internal workings, or goings on but aren’t apparent in any ...


1

Can a brain be intelligent without a body? In my opinion, yes, if you give it the right inputs. The brain is like a machine and its behavior depends on its architecture and the interaction with the environment, whether it is the internet or anything else, so it all boils down to the actual architecture of the system. Intelligence is just an information ...


1

For what its worth (and having done a bit of study on this and being really interested in the topic): the answer seems to go back to the beginnings of AI and even earlier (Turing's 1936 paper in which he introduces what's now called the Turing machine). John McCarthy's filer for the 1956 Dartmouth College summer workshop on "Artificial Intelligence" (...


1

I think a worthwhile extension of this line of thought is "why not both?" I do not believe there is anything preventing approaching the problem from both sides at once. There is a great deal of research on both sides (biological research and computational research), but considerably less on the integration of the two (although there certainly is some, such ...


1

There are a number of reasons why a simulated brain might be better than creating a real brain. One reason is computers can live indefinitely (kind of). Brains may not be able to live forever and there might not be a way to transfer information from one brain to another. One of the principle advantages of a computer then is that it could have more experience ...


1

Artificial intelligence is much more than a research tool for cognitive science. Of course there is some overlapping and researchers of both fields working together. But AI is also broadly used in economics, security (for example face recognition software), advertising, or in the development of games and of course in robotics (autonomous systems). The ...


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