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2

This could be possible, providing you have the right dataset to train it on. The volume of a cup consist of width, height and depth. You can probably detect all three of those given the bounding box or the pixels of the cup. However detecting the dimensions of an object require a reference object, like a penny or your finger and you have to specify the ...


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Decision Tree learners, on their own, are not a good way to deal with imbalanced data. The most commonly used algorithms, by default, make no attempt to address this problem. If you look carefully at the three sources you post, you will find that they actually all agree on this point. Two of the sources actually propose methods of addressing this ...


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It is explained in this CrossValidated post. Top1 accuracy means the best guess (class with highest probability) is the correct result 58.9% of the time, while top5 accuracy means the correct result is in the top 5 best guesses (5 classes with highest probabilities) 87.7% of the time.


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You should use both classes together. Let's say you use the method you proposed. Then they will be contradicting each other as one teaches the network to recognize people, not objects and the other teaches the network to recognizes objects not person. There is no need for seperation of the two classes, unless you are making two seperate classifier. Hope I ...


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You can use append function: final = df1.append(df2, ignore_index=True) To set the last column as labels, you set them as so by: labels = np.array(final["will_buy"]) So, when calling the fit method on the model you build, you set labels = labels.


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We can manipulate a model's test data set if the machine learning model takes user input and uses it to resample test data set. The actual training dataset of the ML model does not get manipulated, but if we figure out the ML model through an exploratory attack (sending a lot of inquiries to the ML model to find out its nature), we can generate a training ...


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In adverserial machine learning, someone (program or human) attempts to fool an existing model with a malicious input. The best human example would be an optical illusion. The human brain's model for image processing starts outputting wrong information when looking at an optical illusion. So in the end we see wrong colour, shape, etc. In this case, the ...


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They don't have acces to the original training or test dataset. Machine learning environments are build on the premise of a benign environment. The models are trained on real data (real inputs). When someone sends a made up input (fake input) it is very easy to fool the model. This is used for example in image recognition. Imagine a fotograph of a panda. ...


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