145 votes
Accepted

Could a paradox kill an AI?

This classic problem exhibits a basic misunderstanding of what an artificial general intelligence would likely entail. First, consider this programmer's joke: The programmer's wife couldn't take it ...
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75 votes
Accepted

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill? It shouldn't. Self-driving cars are not moral agents. Cars fail in predictable ways. Horses fail in predictable ways. the car ...
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  • 1,847
54 votes

Could a paradox kill an AI?

This popular meme originated in the era of 'Good Old Fashioned AI' (GOFAI), when the belief was that intelligence could usefully be defined entirely in terms of logic. The meme seems to rely on the ...
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54 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

The answer to a lot of those questions depends on how the device is programmed. A computer capable of driving around and recognizing where the road goes is likely to have the ability to visually ...
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  • 2,559
31 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

Personally, I think this might be an overhyped issue. Trolley problems only occur when the situation is optimized to prevent "3rd options". A car has brakes, does it not? "But what if the brakes don'...
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  • 496
26 votes

Could a paradox kill an AI?

I see several good answers, but most are assuming that inferential infinite loop is a thing of the past, only related to logical AI (the famous GOFAI). But it's not. An infinite loop can happen in ...
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  • 401
19 votes

Could a paradox kill an AI?

The halting problem says that it's not possible to determine whether any given algorithm will halt. Therefore, while a machine could conceivably recognize some "traps", it couldn't test arbitrary ...
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  • 2,559
17 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

In the real world, decisions will be made based on the law, and as noted over on Law.SE, the law generally favors inaction over action.
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16 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

This is the well known Trolley Problem. As Ben N said, people disagree on the right course of action for trolley problem scenarios, but it should be noted that with self-driving cars, reliability is ...
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16 votes

Could a paradox kill an AI?

Another similar question might be: "What vulnerabilities does an AI have?" "Kill" may not make as much sense with respect to an AI. What we really want to know is, relative to some goal, in what ways ...
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  • 1,847
10 votes

Could a paradox kill an AI?

No. This is easily prevented by a number of safety mechanisms that are sure to be present in a well-designed AI system. For example, a timeout could be used. If the AI system is not able to handle ...
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  • 1,235
10 votes

Could a paradox kill an AI?

Nope in the same way a circular reference on a spreadsheet cannot kill a computer. All loops cyclic dependencies, can be detected (you can always check if a finite Turing machine enters the same state ...
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10 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

“This moral question of whom to save: 99 percent of our engineering work is to prevent these situations from happening at all.” —Christoph von Hugo, Mercedes-Benz This quote is from an article titled ...
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  • 231
9 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

For a driverless car that is designed by a single entity, the best way for it to make decisions about whom to kill is by estimating and minimizing the probable liability. It doesn't need to ...
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  • 1,335
9 votes
Accepted

Would Google's self-driving-car stop when it sees somebody with a T-shirt with a stop sign printed on it?

Google’s self-driving car most likely uses mapping of traffic signs using google street view images for roadway inventory management. If traffic signs are not in its database, it can still “see” and ...
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8 votes

Could a paradox kill an AI?

AIs used in computer games already encounter similar problems, and if well designed, they can avoid it easily. The simplest method to avoid freezing in case of an unsolvable problem is to have a timer ...
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7 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill? By managing legal liability and consumer safety. A car that offers the consumer safety is going to be a car that is bought by said ...
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5 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

They shouldn't. People should. People cannot put the responsibilities of ethical decisions into the hands of computers. It is our responsibility as computer scientists/AI experts to program decisions ...
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  • 281
5 votes

Could a paradox kill an AI?

Well, the issue of anthropomorphizing the AI aside, the answer is "yes, sort of." Depending on how the AI is implemented, it's reasonable to say it could get "stuck" trying to resolve a paradox, or ...
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  • 3,697
4 votes

Could a paradox kill an AI?

It seems to me this is just a probabilistic equation like any other. I'm sure Google handles paradoxical solution sets Billions of times a day, and I can't say my spam filter has ever caused a (ahem) ...
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4 votes

Could a paradox kill an AI?

Killing AI by 'thinking' about a paradox would be called a bug in implementation of that AI, so it's possible (depending how it's being done), but less likely. Most of AI implementation operate in non-...
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4 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

Frankly I think this issue (the Trolley Problem) is inherently overcomplicated, since the real world solution is likely to be pretty straightforward. Like a human driver, an AI driver will be ...
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4 votes

Is there any flaw to this solution to the One shot prisoner's dilemma

This question is re-inventing the analysis for iterated prisoner's dilemma and the co-evolution that can lead to agents playing super-rationally in the one-shot version, which has been studied really ...
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3 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

I think there would not be a way to edit such ethics settings in a car. But hey, if cell phones can be rooted, why not cars? I imagine there'll be Linux builds in the future for specific models that ...
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3 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

The only sensible choice is to use predictable behaviour. So in the people in front of the car scenario: First the car hits the brakes, at the same time honks the horn, and stays on course. The ...
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3 votes

How could self-driving cars make ethical decisions about who to kill?

I think that in most cases the car would default to reducing speed as a main option, rather than steering toward or away from a specific choice. As others have mentioned, having settings related to ...
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2 votes

Is it ethical to implement self-defence for street walking AI robots?

It depends on whether the loss of the robot would end up causing harm to humans. If the robot was supposed to be watching for a suspected terrorist attack to start taking place (so it could alert ...
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  • 2,559
2 votes

Is it ethical to implement self-defence for street walking AI robots?

The question mentions "walking robot", but it may be illustrative to re-frame the discussion in terms of self-driving cars, because: It gives a common point of reference, rather than everyone having ...
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2 votes
Accepted

What would happen if someone jumped in the front of a Google car?

Given this YouTube video which is being given by Sebastian Thrun who had a TED talk which had nowhere near the same level of detail but had similar conclusions, it looks like the lidar system used by ...
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