20

Architectures for recognizing and generating emotion are typically somewhat complex and don't generally have short descriptions, so it's probably better to reference the literature rather than give a misleading soundbite: Some of the early work in affective computing was done by Rosalind W. Picard. There is a research group at MIT specializing in this area. ...


11

The answer to this question, unlike many on this board, I think is definitive. No. We don't need AI's to have emotion to be useful, as we can see by the numerous amount of AI's we already have that are useful. But to further address the question, we can't really give AI's emotions. I think the closest we can get would be 'Can we make this AI act in a way a ...


8

At a very high level, regarding evolutionary game theory and genetic algorithms, it is absolutely possible that AI could develop a state that is analogous with suffering, although, as you astutely point out, it would involve conditions which a computer cares about. (For instance, it might develop a feeling analogous to "being aggrieved" over non-optimality ...


7

There is much discussion in philosophy about inner language and the ability to perceive pain (see Pain in philosophy article). Your question is in the area of philosophy and not science. If you define emotion as some state then you can construct simple automata with two states (emotion vs no-emotion). It can be a very complicated state with degrees of truth (...


7

It's possible to implement a form of curiosity-driven behavior without requiring full 'emotional intelligence'. One elementary strategy would be to define some form of similarity measure on inputs. More generally, Jurgen Schmidhuber has pioneered work on 'Artificial Curiosity/Creativity' and 'Intrinsic Motivation' and has written a number of papers on the ...


6

I think your question fits nowadays more in the field of Human-Robot Interaction, which relies largely on vision for recognition of gestures and follow movements, as well as soft, natural movements as a response. Note that the movements of the face and hands belong to the most complex tasks, involving many muscles at a time. I strongly recommend the film ...


6

The answer to your question is "In principle, yes" - in it's most general form, EQ testing is just a specific case of the Turing test ("How would you feel about ... ?"). To see why meaningful EQ tests might be difficult to achieve, consider the following two possible tests: At one extreme of complexity, the film 'Blade Runner' famously shows a test to ...


6

It is certainly possible for AI to theoretically feel emotion. There are, according to Murray Shanahan's book The Technological Singularity, two primary forms of AI: 1) Human based AI - achieved through processes such as whole brain emulation, the functioning of human based AI would likely be indistinguishable from that of the human brain, and, as a ...


5

Assuming an AI was built out of a mechanical husk, mirroring the human brain exactly; complete with chemical signals and all. An AI should theoretically be capable of feeling/processing emotions.


5

I think the fundamental question is: Why even attempt to build an AI? If that objective is clear, it will provide clarity to whether or not having emotional quotient in AI make sense. Some attempts like "Paro" that were developed for therapeutic reasons requires they exhibit some human like emotions. Again, note that "displaying" emotions and "feeling" ...


5

Will computers be able to understand user emotions? The term Understand is multidimensional, so characterizing the degree of understanding — emotional or otherwise — is a slippery task. Nonetheless, some forms of AI emotional understanding are possible. An Interesting Simple Case Even the embedded programs of velocity sensitive musical ...


5

The release of Adenosine, Dopamine, Endorphin, Endocannabinoids, GABA, Glutamate, Norepinephrine, Oxytocin, Serotonin, and many others into specific regions of the brain are very likely an essential part of both activation tuning of single neurons and neuroplasticity, two essential aspects of organic learning researchers have been and will continue to work ...


5

There are a lot of approaches you could take for this. Creating a realistic artificial analog for fear as implemented biologically in animals might be possible, but there is quite a lot involved in a real animal's fear response that would not apply in simpler AI bots available now. For instance, an animal entering a state of fear will typically use hormones ...


5

Let us describe a very simple system that does something we could label as empathyc. A chatbot answers "I am sorry to hear that. What happened?" when we type "I feel bad", and it replies "I am glad to hear that. Fancy some music?" when we type "I feel good". Somehow, it perceives a human emotion, and acts accordingly. Planes fly but they do not fly as ...


4

Emotion in an AI is useful, but not necessary depending on your objective (in most cases, it's not). In particular, emotion recognition/analysis is very well advanced, and it's used in a wide range of applications very successfully, from robot teacher for autistic children (see developmental robotics) to gambling (poker) to personal agents and politics ...


4

I think emotions are not necessary for an AI agent to be useful. But I also think they could make the agent MUCH more pleasant to work with. If the bot you're talking with can read your emotions and respond constructively, the experience of interacting with it will be tremendously more pleasant, perhaps spectacularly so. Imagine contacting a human call ...


4

One example might be self-play in games. Since neural networks and deep learning depend on massive amounts of data, one way to generate data is to have two virtual machines play each other and record the experience. An example discussion can be found at http://www.cs.cornell.edu/boom/2001sp/Tsinteris/gammon.htm which uses reinforcement learning. I believe ...


4

It's a poorly stated question because these are at least three, possibly four different questions that are quite independent from each other. First, let's take the questions from the text. Selfishness vs generosity of the system - this is quite easy to define as sacrificing resources for "own maintenance" vs "statutory purposes" - "helping others" defined ...


4

AFAIK, pain is produced by the nervous system (after the realease of chemicals), so no AI suffers. AI does not (yet) possess a life (and I don't think this will ever happen). A definition of life from the dictionary: the condition that distinguishes animals and plants from inorganic matter, including the capacity for growth, reproduction, functional ...


3

I have considered much of the responses here, and I would suggest that most people here have missed the point when answering the question about emotions. The problems is, scientists keep looking for a single solution as to what emotions are. This is akin to looking for a single shape that will fit all different shaped slots. Also, what is ignored is that ...


3

I like your choice of "induce" instead of "produce," because the delusions came from the users. This means the answer has to do mostly with human psychology; people come equipped with lots of mental machinery specialized for dealing with other humans and not very much mental machinery specialized for dealing with software. So ELIZA behaved in ways that some ...


3

I think "curiosity" in AI would signify a 'desire to search.' It's an interest, that is experienced by some agent, in making something known that was previously unknown. So to define how much curiosity a chat bot should have, we should: Specify what kinds of information the agent prefers knowing. Measure how much information is unknown about those ...


3

I'd call any system that receives input to be "perceiving", and that can constitute a basic definition of "awareness" or even "consciousness", distinct from "self-awareness" or consciousness in the human sense, which we tend to think of in terms of sentience. What the Chinese Room seems to argue is that sentience is based on qualia, which may be difficult ...


2

Humans have poor understanding of emotional rules. Probably every poster on here has experienced greatly misreading another individual emotionally. Further, people often don't act emotionally how they would expect themselves to act, for example we have all experienced frustration at someone else's irrational concerns and yet we are all guilty of holding ...


2

If anything, multiple intelligences are much more obvious in AI than in other fields, because we haven't yet unlocked how to do transfer between domains. As an example, AlphaGo is very, very good at playing Go, but it's got basically nothing in the way of bodily-kinesthetic intelligence. But other teams have built software to control robots that does have ...


2

Emotions aren't something that you can implement - they're very complex. However, you can attempt to mimic them. Human emotions are closely related to conscious experience characterized by intense mental activity, which is based on interpretation of events. Recent brain studies (including research in cognitive psychology and neurophysiology) suggests that ...


2

Strong AIs For a strong AI, the short answer is to call for help, when they might not even know what the supposed help could be. It depends on what the AI would do. If it is supposed to solve a single easy task perfectly and professionally, sure emotions would not be very useful. But if it is supposed to learn random new things, there would be a point that ...


2

By emotions he doesn't mean to add all sorts of emotions into an AI. He only meant the ones that will be helpful for taking vital decisions. Consider this incident for a second: Suppose an AI self drive car is driving through the highway. The person sitting inside is the CEO of a company and he is running very behind on schedule. If he didn't get on time ...


2

This question is more the province of philosophy of mind than of AI, here are some detailed answers to your question from the philosophy SE: Is simulating emotions the same as experiencing emotions?, and What is the problem with physicalism?. For the record, the accepted answer (by Siri) to the question is not entirely correct (The position in that answer ...


2

I think that depends on the application of the AI. Obviously if I develop an AI that's purpose is plainly to do specific task under the supervision of humans, there is no need for emotions. But if the AI's purpose is to do task autonomously, then emotions or empathy can be useful. For example, think about an AI that is working in the medical domain. Here it ...


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