New answers tagged

0

using different population sizes at different stages of the optimization process can be beneficial. With large population sizes you can effectively explore the landscape to find proper areas. Large population sizes helps in finding global optima or high fitness local optima. However, using large populations require more fitness evaluations and waste of ...


0

There is no general method to detect a change in the fitness landscape, since changes can be very local and can occur in just a small area of the fitness landscape. For this reason nature inspired optimization algorithms usually maintain a diversified population to cope with environmental changes. a common mechanism is using several sub-populations and ...


0

It is entirely possible! You see, the agents will perform whatever actions are available to them, and if the evolutionary algorithm is setup correctly, whatever set of actions provides them with a bigger survival rate will be the one that gets explored and reproduced the most. Here is a very interesting list of "Specification Gaming" in AI, where ...


1

Population size is a tricky issue even in pure biological models. Biological population sizes obviously vary. The two great protagonists of the argument were Ronald Fisher and Sewell Wright, with argument being between Fisher favouring few large populations against Wright’s many small interconnected populations. There is evidence that evolution occurs more ...


1

There is no exact way to assess that a genetic algorithm has located a global optima. Indeed there may be multiple global optima. You must fall back to heuristic methods. The fitness of a population is the maximum fitness of any individual. Unless specific measures are taken to maintain diversity the population will converge to an optima, local or global. At ...


Top 50 recent answers are included