Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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I'm going to assume that by free will, you mean something like the philosophical concept of libertarian free will, which is defended by philosophers like Robert Kane. In Libertarian Free Will, individuals have some capability to make choices about their actions. The classic way to argue this is by assuming some kind of spirit-stuff (e.g. a soul) that exists ...


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Lately with my Google searches, the AI model keeps auto filling the ending of my searches with: “...in Vietnamese” I can see how this would be annoying. I don't think Google's auto-complete algorithm and training data is publicly available. Also it changes frequently as they work to improve the service. As such, it is hard to tell what exactly is ...


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The Saturday Papers: Would AI Lie To You? is a blog post summarizing a research paper called Toward Characters Who Observe, Tell, Misremember, and Lie. This research paper details some researchers' plans to implement "mental models" for NPCs in video games. NPCs will gather information about the world, and convey that knowledge to other people (including ...


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126 million artificial neurons at 12.6 Watts, with IBM's True North Back in 2014, IBM's True North chip was pushing 1 million neurons at less than 100mW. So that's roughly 126 million artificial neurons at 12.6 Watts. A mouse has 70 million neurons. IBM believes they can build a human-brain scale True North mainframe at a "mere" 4kW. Once 3D transistors ...


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There is much discussion in philosophy about inner language and the ability to perceive pain (see Pain in philosophy article). Your question is in the area of philosophy and not science. If you define emotion as some state then you can construct simple automata with two states (emotion vs no-emotion). It can be a very complicated state with degrees of truth (...


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It is certainly possible for AI to theoretically feel emotion. There are, according to Murray Shanahan's book The Technological Singularity, two primary forms of AI: 1) Human based AI - achieved through processes such as whole brain emulation, the functioning of human based AI would likely be indistinguishable from that of the human brain, and, as a ...


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There is no doubt that AI has the potential to pose an existential threat to humanity. The greatest threat to mankind lies with superintelligent AI. An artificial intelligence that surpasses human intelligence will be capable of exponentially increasing its own intelligence, resulting in an AI system that, to humans, will be completely unstoppable. At ...


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Assuming an AI was built out of a mechanical husk, mirroring the human brain exactly; complete with chemical signals and all. An AI should theoretically be capable of feeling/processing emotions.


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One example might be self-play in games. Since neural networks and deep learning depend on massive amounts of data, one way to generate data is to have two virtual machines play each other and record the experience. An example discussion can be found at http://www.cs.cornell.edu/boom/2001sp/Tsinteris/gammon.htm which uses reinforcement learning. I believe ...


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This depends on your definition of human-like. If you mean a robot that looks and acts like a human, arguably, yes. Here's one of many examples: http://www.hansonrobotics.com/robot/sophia/ If you are looking for something that performs work and tasks, or works and thinks and talks like-or better than a human, the answer is mostly no, not yet. I recommend ...


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Will Artificial Intelligence some day become a problem to humanity after learning human behaviors and characteristics? It can be answered in both ways, I think. Yes, they may become a problem. With the increasing integration of loads of apps and smart devices in our life, almost everything defining an individual human being is digitalised. For instance, ...


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Although I’m not sure how an act of freewill could even be described (let alone replicated), Well, one popular definition goes like this: [Free will is] the freedom to act according to one's motives without arbitrary hindrance from other individuals or institutions Source - Wikipedia entry on Compatibilism Note that this definition is perfectly ...


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Another fallacy that appears common to most search engines is that anything a person searches on is an aspect of their own identity. I once searched on walk-in tubs for a very elderly relative, and was followed all over the web by ads for aids for the infirm elderly. Users who recognize that Google uses their searches to build their profile can alter their ...


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The great acting teacher Stella Adler wrote about mannerisms being a powerful tool for actors. Method acting in general focuses on natural performances based roughly on understanding the mindset of the character portrayed. It's possible actors who have portrayed androids have observed industrial robots to inform their physicality, and many performances ...


3

There are basically two worries: If we create an AGI that is a slightly better AGI-programmer than its creators, it might be able to improve its own source code to become even more intelligent. Which would enable it to improve its source code even more etc. Such a selfimproving seed AI might very quickly become superintelligent. The other scenario is that ...


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Yes, it is possible, and has actually been done in the past. The University of Antwerp created a bot to answer questions (this is the technical report). It focused on the git tag only though (even though it did answer one mysql question). Its accuracy was pretty good, and the bots in the tests did earn some reputation. So I assume it is possible. But do ...


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I have considered much of the responses here, and I would suggest that most people here have missed the point when answering the question about emotions. The problems is, scientists keep looking for a single solution as to what emotions are. This is akin to looking for a single shape that will fit all different shaped slots. Also, what is ignored is that ...


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If you limited yourself to 12.6 watts, you wouldn't get much done. Just lookup the power consumption for a modern GPU, look at the size networks people are training on those, and then scale down. For reference, modern GPU's appear to consume between 52-309 watts under heavy use. Clearly energy efficiency is one area where the human brain is still far head ...


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BlindKungFuMaster's answer deals with the hierarchical nature of perception and bodily control, so I'll set that aside and try instead to answer why evolution would use neural networks for animal embodied cognition, and then try to answer if robots of other artificial animals would use the same system. It's important to focus on animals as a whole, not just ...


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To my mind the essential reason why neural networks and the brain are powerful is that they create a hierarchical model of data or of the world. If you ask why that makes them powerful, well, that's just the structure of the world. If you are stalked by a wolf, it's not like its upper jaw will attack you frontally, while his lower jaw will attack you from ...


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Human intelligence is very general / broad in its scope. This is self-evident, and whatever AI ends up to be, we'd like it to be a general problem solver as well (cf. Simon and Newell). Taking liberal interpretations of your question... Why AI in a computer? Computers, to the extent that we can frame problems in general as a solvable computational ...


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One incredibly important difference between humans and NNs is that the human brain is the result of billions of years of evolution whereas NNs were partially inspired by looking at the result and thinking "... we could do that" (utmost respect for Hubel and Wiesel). Human brains (and in fact anything biological really) have an embedded structure to them ...


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The Wikipedia entry on this personality theory says of Type A people: The theory describes Type A individuals as ambitious, rigidly organized, highly status-conscious, sensitive, impatient, anxious, proactive, and concerned with time management. People with Type A personalities are often high-achieving "workaholics." All of those attributes could ...


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No. In that the question includes "knowingly" which would require that any AI knows anything. If this is anything like the way humans know things (though interestingly it doesn't require actually knowing things), it would require some sense of individuality, probably self-awareness, possibly some kind of consciousness, the ability to render an opinion and ...


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You'll have to provide more context around your use of the word "lie" if you don't want your answer to be satisfiable by some trivial example, like: (let [equal? (fn [a b] (if (= a b) false true)] (equal 1 2)) => true The complexity of the answer depends on what you mean by "know" when you say "knowingly lie." There is some sense in which the above '...


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This question is more the province of philosophy of mind than of AI, here are some detailed answers to your question from the philosophy SE: Is simulating emotions the same as experiencing emotions?, and What is the problem with physicalism?. For the record, the accepted answer (by Siri) to the question is not entirely correct (The position in that answer ...


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Emotions are a factor in humans having ethics/morals only because they are a factor in all human learning and decision-making. Unless you are duplicating a human being exactly, there is no reason to think that an AI will learn the way a human learns, or make decisions in the same way a human makes decisions. Therefore, whether it "feels emotion" just like ...


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I would define intelligence as a ability to predict future. So if someone is intelligent, he can predict some aspects of future, and decide what to do based on his predictions. So, if "intelligent" person decide to hurt other persons, he might be very effective at this (for example Hitler and his staff). Artificial intelligence might be extremely effective ...


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It's important to note that ultimately, the statistical methods we currently use in ML research are just that: statistical methods. So when they show some "bad behaviour" it's not because of problems with the statistical methods, but with the data we give it. But if the data we give it are as "genuine and unfiltered" as it gets, then it probably shows ...


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Computers (the processor in combination with the memory) are designed to be deterministic. Otherwise no software would ever work, because the computer would be executing it randomly. The computer's outcomes are not determined by the chaotic movements of electrons, but by the much strong deterministic currents and voltages between the transistors. A ...


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