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Can a brain be intelligent without a body? No. Don't forget that the main function of the brain is to provide homeostasis between the body and the environment. Without the body, the utility of the brain is no longer relevant. Alternatively, why consider intelligence only in the brain? How far does our body extend? Embodied cognitive science asks us to ...


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There are a lot of examples of animals that have been trained by humans (to perform some specific task). For example, dogs, tigers or chimpanzees. Nonetheless, none of them have exhibited a general intelligence comparable to that of humans. Why is that? It is believed that the intelligence of mammals is (at least partially) determined by the size of the ...


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Some fields that humans are born with advantages: Fast and precise image processing ability. Even the stupidest human can tell the edge of two different objects precisely, e.g. which part of the image is a dog and which is a cat. Fuzzy learning ability. Humans don't need to see all kinds of cats to identify a cat. As long as we see some cats (real ones or ...


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The "baseline humans" you describe have been historically described in the media industry as "the lowest common denominator" (LCD). The LCD is the broadest possible audience for content, traditionally for network television shows. (Before the age of cable, there were only 3 to 4 networks and all video content was broadcast over the airwaves--no way to ...


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First Question To treat this question in a scientific way, because I think it is a reasonable enough question that draws on the realities of postmodern culture in post industrialized societies to be treated scientifically, we should define some things. The most difficult is intelligence, which is the realm in which smartness, cleverness, and stupidity ...


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From Norvig and Russel definitions of rationality: Thinking Rationally - The Greek philosopher Aristotle was one of the first to attempt to codify “right thinking,” that is, irrefutable reasoning processes. His syllogisms provided patterns for argument structures that always yielded correct conclusions when given correct premises—for example, “...


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Survival, Imagining, Moral Reasoning The thing that comes to mind is a new-born, when you said "the stupidest human", and it already has some basic “survival instincts”. It will avoid pain, consume food, and quickly learn to distinguish "safe" and "dangerous" conditions and people. We have computer programs that can learn chess ...


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I do not know the precise definition of intelligence, but from lots of people I have interacted with, they regard people as intelligent on a particular field, if and only if: They are able to take split second correct decisions in a situation in that particular field. Let us see where AI have succeeded in this case: Elon Musk’s Dota 2 AI beats the ...


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It depends what you mean by intelligence. A robot that acts has a different sort of intelligence than a neural net that merely maps inputs to outputs. Bit patterns within a robot brain have meaning, whereas the meaning of the inputs and outputs of gain meaning only through the larger system in which humans steer input data to it, and act on the basis of the ...


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This is an old question, going back at least to 1950. It is one of the original objections to AI that Turing considers and attempts to refute in his seminal 1950 paper Computing Machinery and Intelligence. Turing actually attributes this objection to Lady Lovelace, apparently quoted by another author. In Turing's paper, this is objection #6: Lady Lovelace's ...


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If the measurements you want from the object aren't too complicated (ie. length of a clearly defined feature), and if you are able to acquire a training dataset of images of the objects similar to what your model will see in your use case (same scale/distance), their bounding boxes and their measurements, a model you could try to implement is a Multi-Task ...


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Father Ted explains why this is a hard problem. Seriously -- if you have stereo images it should be possible, since that's what we use for depth perception. If you know how far away points x1 and x2 are, then you can measure distance using trigonometry. No neural networks needed, I guess. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulation_(computer_vision)


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Philosophically, my own research has led me to understand AI as any artifact that makes a decision. This is because the etymology of "intelligence" strongly implies "selecting between alternatives", and these meanings are baked in all the way back to the proto-Indo-European. (Degree of intelligence, or "strength" is merely a measure of utility, typically ...


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AI is not a simple term. There are different types, ranging from the most simplistic rule-based AI to black-box AI's so complicated it's unreasonable for a human to understand exactly what they're doing. There's no pseudocode that if used in a program automatically constitutes it as an AI. It's not that black and white. But I can give examples: Here's a ...


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No, the way human minds think is in no way related to the way an AI thinks. Although you could say that AI is a much simpler form that represents how the brain processes information. For the human brain to think, sense, and act there are billions of connections is various cortex's of the brain that process information in different ways. If talking about ...


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I would say: no, it's not just an extension of human intelligence. Actually, I would argue there's nothing like human intelligence. At least it's not clearly distinguishable from intelligence in general. If you say AI is just a set of instructions that are made by humans, you might be right. But what if this set of instructions contains instructions on how ...


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I believe AI is, at least in certain ways, both an extension of human intelligence & creativity, and something independent as well. Note people didn't design airplanes to try to fly like birds do. Although planes use the same principles of aerodynamics that birds use to fly, we've adapted how those physics principles are applied to accommodate what we ...


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No it isn't. AI is essentially human intelligence with a combination of computing power to achieve tasks that a human alone cannot achieve in the time period that a programmed machine can. To give an example. A human can identify a pattern in a data set of say 1000 records. However if that same logic needs applied to a data set of a billion records, a ...


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I think no, it isn't. The reason I would say no, is that in order for it to be an extension of our intelligence & creativity, it must be limited by it. This, I believe, isn't the case however. We are capable of creating an AI that is smarter than ourselves (say at Go or Chess, without cheating and checking every possible move), and so it is not bound by ...


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Maybe, but it depends to a very large degree on the choice of definition. One of the biggest challenges for AI researchers, neuroscientists, philosophers, and psychologists, has been that the layperson's understanding of intelligence does not appear to correspond to a well-defined concept. This point was most famously exploited by John R. Searle in his ...


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Measuring and classifying human abilities related to intelligence have been done through a number of metrics. Grades — When a student has very high grades, other students, teachers, and siblings tend to think and say that they are smart, even if they spend much time studying. College readiness test results — This is actually the most tuned methodology and ...


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Can a brain be intelligent without a body? If you define "intelligence" as "doing the right thing at the right time", then the statement itself implies some sort of embodied context, whether humanoid, networked or otherwise. If you have a more existential definition where by fact that there are internal workings, or goings on but aren’t apparent in any ...


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Can a brain be intelligent without a body? In my opinion, yes, if you give it the right inputs. The brain is like a machine and its behavior depends on its architecture and the interaction with the environment, whether it is the internet or anything else, so it all boils down to the actual architecture of the system. Intelligence is just an information ...


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You can solve something rationally or with emotions/intuition. Intelligence can be rational or intuitive. Rational is the newest more accurate form of intelligence. Humans use both types of intelligences.


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I recall someone (my prof probably) saying that the difference is that intelligence is a problem-solving capability, while rationality more-so refers the capability to apply one's intelligence. ex: You are smart for knowing that sleeping late is bad for your health, but if you still sleep late then you are irrational. In that sense then, rationality is ...


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There are still many different interpretations of the terms intelligence and consciousness. For the sake of this discussion I would define intelligence as the problem solving capabilities and consciousness as the state of being aware of and responsive to one's surroundings, including the experience of qualia. If I understand your question correctly, you are ...


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Computers can interpret language, but I don't believe they understand it. Also, it's interpretation is bounded by the algorithmic constructs, like data sets and the routines that run against it. Consciousness, on the other hand, is an emergent quality and includes self-awareness amongst other things, and self-awareness is a subjective experience. Computer ...


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First thing we were taught in AI: Humans didn't create airplanes by studying and mimicing birds, they studied aerodynamics and physics. Although difficult to articulate I've had very similar thought patterns to yours when I was thinking about AI and further I watched very closely the development of my child from being a newborn to where he is now, a year ...


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