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Right, AI is an extension of human creativity and the implied limitation is that it inherits bias through the specific choice of which features to consider. Given a set of features it is then far more able at calculating which combination of features best helps explain the relationship being considered than is the human mind. Humans are too distracted to ...


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The answer in part seems to depend on what you mean by "human intelligence". If you mean behavior that would usually be regarded as requiring intelligence were a human to produce it, then various types machines can be intelligent. Such "intelligent" machines presumably include player pianos. Playing the piano and producing a melody is widely regarded as ...


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No, the way human minds think is in no way related to the way an AI thinks. Although you could say that AI is a much simpler form that represents how the brain processes information. For the human brain to think, sense, and act there are billions of connections is various cortex's of the brain that process information in different ways. If talking about ...


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This is an old question, going back at least to 1950. It is one of the original objections to AI that Turing considers and attempts to refute in his seminal 1950 paper Computing Machinery and Intelligence. Turing actually attributes this objection to Lady Lovelace, apparently quoted by another author. In Turing's paper, this is objection #6: Lady Lovelace's ...


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I would say: no, it's not just an extension of human intelligence. Actually, I would argue there's nothing like human intelligence. At least it's not clearly distinguishable from intelligence in general. If you say AI is just a set of instructions that are made by humans, you might be right. But what if this set of instructions contains instructions on how ...


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Artificial Intelligence is a simulation of neurons interacting to each other. It's a very good copy of the model of a Neuron, where the input shows the acting of dendrites, the cell body (soma) represents the Neuron class itself. And the output is the axon. In general, the answer to your question would be - not yet. There are many aspects that are needed ...


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Taking into account the super computing power that is added to human intelligence, the name artificial intelligence is more superfluous. I propose to say augmented intelligence as well as augmented reality.


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I believe AI is, at least in certain ways, both an extension of human intelligence & creativity, and something independent as well. Note people didn't design airplanes to try to fly like birds do. Although planes use the same principles of aerodynamics that birds use to fly, we've adapted how those physics principles are applied to accommodate what we ...


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No it isn't. AI is essentially human intelligence with a combination of computing power to achieve tasks that a human alone cannot achieve in the time period that a programmed machine can. To give an example. A human can identify a pattern in a data set of say 1000 records. However if that same logic needs applied to a data set of a billion records, a ...


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I think no, it isn't. The reason I would say no, is that in order for it to be an extension of our intelligence & creativity, it must be limited by it. This, I believe, isn't the case however. We are capable of creating an AI that is smarter than ourselves (say at Go or Chess, without cheating and checking every possible move), and so it is not bound by ...


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