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The rhetorical point of the Turing Test is that it places the 'test' for 'humanity' in observable outcomes, instead of in internal components. If you would behave the same in interacting with an AI as you would with a person, how could you know the difference between them? But that doesn't mean it's reliable, because intelligence has many different ...


10

The problem of the Turing Test is that it tests the machines ability to resemble humans. Not necessarily every form of AI has to resemble humans. This makes the Turing Test less reliable. However, it is still useful since it is an actual test. It is also noteworthy that there is a prize for passing or coming closest to passing the Turing Test, the Loebner ...


7

The classical Turing Test certainly does have limitations. Because I don't see it mentioned here yet, I'll suggest you read about The Chinese Room, which is one of the most commonly cited reasons why the Turing Test indeed falls short of ascertaining true 'consciousness'. However, I'd also note that Turing himself, in the original paper that proposed the ...


7

When we use the term rationality in AI, it tends to conform to the game theory/decision theory definition of rational agent. In a solved or tractable game, an agent can have perfect rationality. If the game is intractable, rationality is necessarily bounded. (Here, "game" can be taken to mean any problem.) There is also the issue of imperfect information ...


7

Utility is a fundamental to Artificial Intelligence because it is the means by which we evaluate an agent's performance in relation to a problem. To distinguish between the concept of economic utility and utility-based computing functions, the term "performance measure" is utilized. The simplest way to distinguish between a goal-based agent and a utility-...


6

There are no distinguishable hardware examples for each IA class. The same mobile robot architecture with proper sensors can be implemented to behave as any IA class. The way you can determine the class of an intelligent agent is from the way it processes the percept. Based on chapter 2 of Artificial Intelligent: A Modern Approach I will try to give a ...


5

The ultimate goal of machine learning is to bypass the developer... When we will have a "master algorithm" that can learn how to generalize any function or algorithm from examples, it can essentially replace any developer, skip the 'development" stage, going from problem directly to algorithm. We can't know when this will happen, but as we surrounded with ...


5

There are many definitions of Artificial Intelligence out in the wild. All these definitions are part of one (or more) of the areas. There are four main domains, and the picture below will shed some light over this. Turing Test revolves around the left side of the cardinality, which is mostly concerned with how humans think or act. But, we know that this is ...


5

It's not just Hawking, you hear variations on this refrain from a lot of people. And given that they're mostly very smart, well educated, well informed people (Elon Musk is another, for example), it probably shouldn't be dismissed out of hand. Anyway, the basic idea seems to be this: If we create "real" artificial intelligence, at some point, it will be ...


4

"the human mind is a battleground of higher level goals and lower level goals "— Marvin Minsky paraphrasing Sigmund Freud I argue that in general human agents try to maximise a hierarchy of performance measures. performance measures of humans Survival of genetic data Energy supply and Water Sex myriad subgoals.... Mysterious mental mechanisms which ...


4

Because he did not yet know how far away current AI is... Working in an media AI lab, I get this question a lot. But really... we are still a long way from this. The robots still do everything we detailledly describe them to do. Instead of seeing the robot as intelligent, I would look to the human programmer for where the creativity really happens.


4

This depends on your definition of human-like. If you mean a robot that looks and acts like a human, arguably, yes. Here's one of many examples: http://www.hansonrobotics.com/robot/sophia/ If you are looking for something that performs work and tasks, or works and thinks and talks like-or better than a human, the answer is mostly no, not yet. I recommend ...


4

Your problem is an old one. There are many methods, referred to as Voice Activity Detection (VAD) methods, which detect speech from an audio signal. The typical design of a VAD algorithm follows one of more of these 3 approaches: A noise reduction stage, e.g. via spectral subtraction. Some features or quantities are calculated from a section of the input ...


4

Well, what I can think about at the moment is the following scenarios : Decision Maker : If you have any problem making a decision, chatbots can be used to weight evidence and give you statistics to rule out bad decisions. Online Teacher : In the far future, chatbots may acquire human-like skills, they maybe used to teach different students (from different ...


4

I've read that a simple reflex agent will not act rationally in a lot of environments. E.g. a simple reflex agent can't act rationally when driving a car as it needs previous perceptions to make correct decisions. I wouldn't say that the need for previous perceptions is the reason why a simple reflex agent doesn't act rationally. I'd say the more serious ...


4

The agent in RL is the component that makes the decision of what action to take. In order to make that decision, the agent is allowed to use any observation from the environment, and any internal rules that it has. Those internal rules can be anything, but typically in RL, it expects the current state to be provided by the environment, for that state to ...


3

No, there is nothing novel about this system. The main hurdle he had to pass was problems that you will face when your system has a lot of integration points across various APIs provided by different vendors with messy and often outdated documentation. As far as attention is concerned we live in a world where so called celebrities get attention for ...


3

By AI is it artificial or more analytical What makes us learn hat makes us learn?i ask i am a dr Can we be better clinicians Artificial Intelligence ? What can we learn from AI? is therefore defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition,...


3

Phrase detection instead of text-to-speech It's worth noting that detection of particular phrases or commands is considered a distinct problem, different from text to speech / text transcription. While you can simply convert everything it hears to text and then look up keywords there, a specialized detector that directly tries to match incoming audio to a ...


3

I don't think there are many contexts where there is any really meaningful distinction between these terms. Even in the WP article you refer to, it is shown that "abstract intelligent agent" and "autonomous intelligent agent" are generally just synonyms for "intelligent agent" but used to highlight certain aspects of intelligent agents in some contexts. ...


3

It depends on how the test is given. For example, when people claimed that a machine had successfully passed the Turing Test a few years ago, the criteria was pretty weak. It only had to fool 30% of the people for 5 minutes. That's not much of a test. To put this in perspective you probably wouldn't detect schizophrenia, autism, learning disabilities, or ...


3

There are a number of long resources to answer this sort of question: consider Stuart Armstrong's book Smarter Than Us, Nick Bostrom's book Superintelligence, which grew out of this edge.org answer, Tim Urban's explanation, or Michael Cohen's explanation. But here's my (somewhat shorter) answer: intelligence is all about decision-making, and we don't have ...


3

He says this because it can happen. If something becomes smarter than us, why would it continue to serve us? The worst case scenario is that it takes over all manufacturing processes and consumes all matter to convert it into material capable of computation, extending outward infinitely until all matter is consumed. We know that AI is dangerous but it doesn'...


3

As Andrew Ng said, worrying about such threat from AI is like worrying about of overpopulation on Mars. It is science fiction. That being said, given the rise of (much weaker) robots and other (semi-)autonomous agents, the fields of the law and ethics are increasingly incorporating them, e.g. see Roboethics.


3

To put it simply in layman terms, what are the possible threats from AI? Currently, there are no threat. The threat comes if humans create a so-called ultraintelligent machine, a machine that can surpass all intellectual activities by any human. This would be the last invention man would need to do, since this machine is better in inventing machines than ...


3

Excellent question. Suppose that artificial consciousness does exist in the future. Let's call it Aiwyn (as in “I win” and “AI win”). Now, the question is what will Aiwyn do and why? To answer this question, we need to understand the theory of infinite games. James P. Carse, a professor emeritus of history and literature of religion ...


3

Machine learning is equal to a data-driven approach. Recording plan-traces of an expert for guied policy search is called in the literature “Case based reasoning”. A huge amount of data were stored in a structured way, and this helps to solve new problems. If the rawdata are available, some sort of search method has to be found. The most dominant kind of ...


3

The acclaimed book Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (by Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig) gives a definition of an agent An agent is anything that can be viewed as perceiving its environment through sensors and acting upon that environment through actuators. This definition is illustrated by the following figure This definition (and ...


2

It rather depends on how one defines several of the terms used. For example: Whether the term "expected" is interpreted in a formal (i.e. statistical) sense. Whether it's assumed that humans have any kind of utilitarian "performance measure". The motivation for this description of "agent" arose from a desire to have a quantitative model - it's not clear ...


2

Is the Turing Test, or any of its variants, a reliable test of artificial intelligence? Myopia Yes, if one defines the term Artificial Intelligence in terms of Alan Turing's Imitation Game or one of its variants. The approach may be, at the same time, both valid and very limited as a definition of intelligence as people interpreted the word before AI ...


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