129

This classic problem exhibits a basic misunderstanding of what an artificial general intelligence would likely entail. First, consider this programmer's joke: The programmer's wife couldn't take it anymore. Every discussion with her husband turned into an argument over semantics, picking over every piece of trivial detail. One day she sent him to the ...


45

This popular meme originated in the era of 'Good Old Fashioned AI' (GOFAI), when the belief was that intelligence could usefully be defined entirely in terms of logic. The meme seems to rely on the AI parsing commands using a theorem prover, the idea presumably being that it's driven into some kind of infinite loop by trying to prove an unprovable or ...


24

I see several good answers, but most are assuming that inferential infinite loop is a thing of the past, only related to logical AI (the famous GOFAI). But it's not. An infinite loop can happen in any program, whether it's adaptive or not. And as @SQLServerSteve pointed out, humans can also get stuck in obsessions and paradoxes. Modern approaches are ...


15

The halting problem says that it's not possible to determine whether any given algorithm will halt. Therefore, while a machine could conceivably recognize some "traps", it couldn't test arbitrary execution plans and return EWOULDHANG for non-halting ones. The easiest solution to avoid hanging would be a timeout. For example, the AI controller process could ...


13

Another similar question might be: "What vulnerabilities does an AI have?" "Kill" may not make as much sense with respect to an AI. What we really want to know is, relative to some goal, in what ways can that goal be subverted? Can a paradox subvert an agent's logic? What is a paradox, other than some expression that subverts some kind of expected behavior?...


9

Nope in the same way a circular reference on a spreadsheet cannot kill a computer. All loops cyclic dependencies, can be detected (you can always check if a finite turing machine enters the same state twice). Even stronger assumption, if the machine is based on machine learning (where it is trained to recognize patterns), any sentence it is just a pattern ...


9

No. This is easily prevented by a number of safety mechanisms that are sure to be present in a well-designed AI system. For example, a timeout could be used. If the AI system is not able to handle a statement or a command after a certain amount of time, the AI could ignore the statement and move on. If a paradox ever does cause an AI to freeze, it's more ...


8

AIs used in computer games already encounter similar problems, and if well designed, they can avoid it easily. The simplest method to avoid freezing in case of an unsolvable problem is to have a timer interrupt the calculation if it runs too long. Usually encountered in strategy games, and more specifically in turn based tactics, if a specific move the ...


8

I can say that among AI researchers I interact with, it far more common to view it as wild speculation than as settled fact. This is borne out by surveys of AI researchers, with 80% thinking strong forms of AI will emerge in "more than 50 years" or "never", and just a few percent thinking that such forms of AI are "near". Software Developers are not the ...


7

Here are my suggestions Her, the AI part (movie spoiler): Ex Machina the AI part (movie spoiler): Eagle Eye, the AI part (movie spoiler): Big Hero 6, the AI part (movie spoiler):


5

It seems to me this is just a probabilistic equation like any other. I'm sure Google handles paradoxical solution sets Billions of times a day, and I can't say my spam filter has ever caused a (ahem) stack overflow. Perhaps one day our programming model will break in a way we can't understand and then all bets are off. But I do take exception to the ...


5

Well, the issue of anthropomorphizing the AI aside, the answer is "yes, sort of." Depending on how the AI is implemented, it's reasonable to say it could get "stuck" trying to resolve a paradox, or decide an undecidable problem. And that's the core issue - decidability. A computer can chew on an undecidable program forever (in principle) without ...


5

2001 (1968) HAL 9000 is a great example of an artificial general intelligence that goes astray, where the humans don't understand the reasoning process as values dis-align. (This is a nod to Asimov in the sense of humans not understanding the implications of a logical framework. Marvin Minsky was an adviser on the film.) BladeRunner (1982) The critical ...


5

As Artificial Intelligence is rapidly invading in our lives the myths around AI is also fabricating rapidly. Before getting into details one need to get clear off from this myths. Myth 1: AI will take away our jobs: Reality: AI is not completely different from other technologies and AI will not take away jobs but AI will change the way we work and helps us ...


4

Killing AI by 'thinking' about a paradox would be called a bug in implementation of that AI, so it's possible (depending how it's being done), but less likely. Most of AI implementation operate in non-linear code, therefore there is no such thing as an infinite loop which can "freeze" the computer's 'consciousness', unless code managing such AI consist ...


4

The great acting teacher Stella Adler wrote about mannerisms being a powerful tool for actors. Method acting in general focuses on natural performances based roughly on understanding the mindset of the character portrayed. It's possible actors who have portrayed androids have observed industrial robots to inform their physicality, and many performances ...


3

I am unsure about the cyberpunk portion of this, but there has been an extensive feminist literature developed under the topic of "Gynoids" and the gendering of robots and other forms of AI (like virtual assistants). These papers tend to argue that the choice of gender assigned by AI developers to their creations is reflective of implicit social views and ...


3

John R. Pierce led the Bell Labs research team that created the first transistor and gave it its name. He was later the Chief Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at CalTech. His relationship to artificial intelligence research was mainly in regard to language translation. He wrote the following.1 The computer has opened up to linguists a host of ...


3

There is at least one very important and serious AI scientist that apparently believes in the creation of true artificial general intelligence and possibly superintelligence: Jürgen Schmidhuber, who is the co-author of the LSTM, among many other important contributions. In fact, he recently founded NNAISENSE for this ultimate purpose, that is, to build a ...


2

If certain philosophers are correct, Artificial General Intelligence will be, like fusion power, "always twenty years away". For the true believers, it is an inevitability, and opinions vary. It may be most useful to look at the unreliability human predictions in this area. There was an article in the MIT Tech Review in 2017 that contained this graphic,...


2

Here are the best movies about artificial intelligence 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Colossus: The Forbin Project (1970) Blade Runner (1982) A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001) Her (2013)


2

A great movie to watch would be A.I. Artificial Intelligence, which is a sort of modern retelling of Pinocchio. Another good AI movie where the main character is a robot would be Bicentennial Man, based on Isaac Asimov's the positronic man.


2

The Machine, which came out a year before Ex-Machina, features topics such as ethics, AI testing (specifically, the Turing test), artificial consciousness, emotional intelligence, artificial general intelligence, super-intelligence, the singularity and AI safety. An old but milestone movie is Wargames, which will likely get you some points for digging back ...


2

Transcendence was a a pretty good look at a super-intelligent AI.


2

In artificial intelligence, even though not everyone agrees, a common (and maybe the biggest) myth is that of the intelligence explosion, which some people claim will happen (without considering physical limits or knowing anything about thermodynamics).


2

The world seems to be operating under the "law of maximum intelligence" (I made this up), which is that the species with the most intelligence get to realise its preferences the most strongly. Put another way, the more intelligent you are, the more the world takes the shape of what you want; and this happens through your actions upon the world. This is ...


1

I don't like to be a killjoy, but this question seems premature (that's why it's hd the "mythology of AI" tag added to it). The kinds of emergent artificial general intelligence depicted in the movies you mention are in science fiction films because they are science fiction. Most AI researchers do not think they are likely to appear anytime soon. The ...


1

Maybe, but it depends to a very large degree on the choice of definition. One of the biggest challenges for AI researchers, neuroscientists, philosophers, and psychologists, has been that the layperson's understanding of intelligence does not appear to correspond to a well-defined concept. This point was most famously exploited by John R. Searle in his ...


1

Right now, the scenarios where automata protect their own existence is limited. In the case of autonomous vehicles, primary goals would certainly be collision avoidance, and other hazards (deep water, cliff faces, etc.) It's possible that arial drones could have certain automated defense mechanisms specific to airborne threats such a missiles. Bots ...


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