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60

I want to reframe your question. Don't think about switching, think about adding. In data science you'll be able to go very far with either python or r but you'll go farthest with both. Python and r integrate very well, thanks to the reticulate package. I often tidy data in r because it is easier for me, train a model in python to benefit from superior ...


35

Python comes with a huge amount of inbuilt libraries. Many of the libraries are for Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. Some of the libraries are Tensorflow (which is high-level neural network library), scikit-learn (for data mining, data analysis and machine learning), pylearn2 (more flexible than scikit-learn), etc. The list keeps going and never ...


28

Of course, this type of questions will also lead to primarily opinion-based answers. Nonetheless, it is possible to enumerate the strengths and weakness of each language, with respect to machine learning, statistics, and data analysis tasks, which I will try to list below. R Strengths R was designed and developed for statisticians and data analysts, so it ...


25

Practically all of the most popular and widely used deep-learning frameworks are implemented in Python on the surface and C/C++ under the hood. I think the main reason is that Python is widely used in scientific and research communities, because it's easy to experiment with new ideas and code prototypes quickly in a language with minimal syntax like Python. ...


15

You don't need a powerful language for programming AI. Most of the developers are using libraries like Keras, Torch, Caffe, Watson, TensorFlow, etc. Those libraries are highly optimized and handle all the though work, they are built with high performance languages, like C. Python is just there to describe the neural network layers, load data, launch the ...


9

C++ is actually one of the most popular languages used in the AI/ML space. Python may be more popular in general, but as others have noted, it's actually quite common to have hybrid systems where the CPU intensive number-crunching is done in C++ and Python is used for higher level functions. Just to illustrate: http://mloss.org/software/language/c__/ http:...


9

Should I be changing the weights/biases on every single sample before moving on to the next sample, You can do this, it is called stochastic gradient descent (SGD) and typically you will shuffle the dataset before working through it each time. or should I first calculate the desired changes for the entire lot of 1,000 samples, and only then start ...


6

I didn't have this choice because I was forced to move from R to Python: It depends on your environment: When you are embedded in an engineer department, working technical group or something similar than Python is more feasible. When you are surrounded by scientists and especially statisticians, stay with R. PS: R offers keras and tensorflow as well ...


5

This is fairly boilerplate advice, but, since you're brand new to AI, I'd personally suggest writing a classical Tic-Tac-Toe AI, ideally using minimax. I suggest this because minimax is fundamental to AI, and there are many webpages devoted to this subject, such as How to make your Tic Tac Toe game unbeatable by using the minimax algorithm and Tic Tac Toe: ...


5

It depends how flexible it needs to be: if you have a fully-fledged system ready for production, which is not going to need much adjusting, then C++ (or even C) might be fine. You need to put a lot of time into building the software, but then it should run pretty fast. However, if you're still experimenting with settings and parameters, and maybe need to ...


5

What attracts me to Python for my analysis work is the "full-stack" of tools that are available by virtue of being designed as a general purpose language vs. R as a domain specific language. The actual data analysis is only part of the story, and Python has rich tools and a clean full-featured language to get from the beginning to the end in a single ...


5

Python has a standard library in development, and a few for AI. It has an intuitive syntax, basic control flow, and data structures. It also supports interpretive run-time, without standard compiler languages. This makes Python especially useful for prototyping algorithms for AI.


5

Firstly, before we commence I recommend that you refer to similar questions on the network such as https://datascience.stackexchange.com/questions/25053/best-practical-algorithm-for-sentence-similarity and https://stackoverflow.com/questions/62328/is-there-an-algorithm-that-tells-the-semantic-similarity-of-two-phrases To determine the similarity of ...


5

All of these could be problem specific (except maybe accuracy). Most of it is documented here: accuracy: Percentage of correct number of classifications accuracy_baseline: Accuracy baseline based on labels mean. This is the best the model could do by always predicting one class. (source) AUC or Area Under the (ROC) Curve is quite complicated, but tells you ...


5

Genetic algorithms and Neural Networks both are "general" methods, in the sense that they are not "domain-specific", they do not rely specifically on any domain knowledge of the game of Mario. So yes, if they can be used to successfully learn how to play Mario, it is likely that they can also be applied with similar success to other Platformers (or even ...


4

The best approach at this time (2019): The most efficient approach now is to use Universal Sentence Encoder by Google (paper_2018) which computes semantic similarity between sentences using the dot product of their embeddings (i.e learned vectors of 215 values). Similarity is a float number between 0 (i.e no similarity) and 1 (i.e strong similarity). The ...


4

Is a Mindstorm considered AI? This depends on what type of software you write in it... The algorithms you write could be seen as AI. You can absolutely use Python to progam it (or java or other languages). Check this link for a tutorial.


4

Blackjack is usually modelled using Monte Carlo (MC) Methods. There is a lot of literature on MC methods which is interesting on its own right but here is a paper describing how MC is applied to Blackjack. There is also a good description on page 110 of the Introduction to Reinforcement Learning. Good luck!


4

The usual parameters to adjust in a k-means: Number of clusters (recall many clusters can have same label). Distance definition (euclidean is the most basic, Gauss is an improvement) Selection of initial cluster positions. Data preprocessing (data normalization, ...)


4

While dyedgreen is right in some respects, I don't agree entirely with that sentiment. Sure, you can theoretically use any language as long as you know the maths and understand the concepts inside and out whilst having some applicable knowledge. However, I don't believe if you are starting from scratch, you should learn to develop models in Java. While the ...


4

What aspects of AI would be most applicable to creating a self learning game AI for a racing game (Q-Learning, NEAT etc) In general, you are looking at a problem that involves sequential decision making, in a machine learning context. If you are wanting to build an agent that can learn by receiving screen images, then NEAT cannot scale to that complexity ...


4

Does it make sense? In general, yes it is interpretable, back propagation will work, and the NN can be optimised. By using ReLU, the default network has a minimum logit of $0$ for the softmax input, which means at least initially that there will be higher minimum probabilities associated with all classes (compared to allowing negative logits which would ...


4

$TD(\lambda)$ return has the following form: \begin{equation} G_t^\lambda = (1 - \lambda) \sum_{n=1}^{\infty} \lambda^{n-1} G_{t:t+n} \end{equation} For you MDP $TD(1)$ looks like this: \begin{align} G &= 0.64 (r_0 + r_2 + r_4 + r_5 + r_6) + 0.36(r_1 + r_3 + r_4 + r_5 + r_6)\\ G &\approx 6.164 \end{align} $TD(\lambda)$ looks like this: \begin{...


4

I would say yes. Python is better than R for most tasks, but R has its niche and you would still want to use it in many circumstances. Additionally, learning a second language will improve your programming skills. My own perspective on the strengths of R vs Python is that I would prefer R for a small, single-purpose program involving tables or charts, or ...


3

Python has rich library, it is also object oriented, easy to program. It can be also used as frontend language. That's why it is used in artificial intelligence. Rather than AI it is also used in machine learning, soft computing, NLP programming and also used as web scripting or in Ethical hacking.


3

Decision tree nodes are split bases on the number of data samples, these numbers indicate the number of data samples they are fit to. In your case samples = 256. It is further split into two nodes of 154 and 102.


3

This is too broad a topic to answer directly. If you are at the beginner stage with neural networks, you will need to learn some basic theory of the maths of neural networks, before the code will make sense. Although it is possible to write neural network code with only a vague understanding of what is going on, it is not a great way to learn for the ...


3

I would not recommend using neural networks and NLP together to create a system sufficiently capable of conversation/dialogue that it would pass that current crop of Turing-like tests. Conversations follow certain rules and regularities (which we have only partially discovered so far), and training an ANN with dialogues in order to pick up those ...


3

For a foundation, there is nothing better than Cybernetics by Norbert Wiener. It is surprising how advanced this MIT professor was, prior to Turing's thought experiment on a general purpose computing machine or the embodiment of the von Neumann architecture upon which most contemporary computers are based. In key ways his analysis of time series and ...


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