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No, "Google's view of AI" (which in and of itself already is kind of vague, there are plenty of people within Google who have very different ideas) has not risen to the status of universal truth. It sometimes seems that, when people don't understand something in a paper with the word Google anywhere in the authorship block, it is automatically assumed ...


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One risk that’s already realized: large online vendors think they have implemented artificial intelligence in their “help” pages and therefore they can (try to) make it impossible to get to someone who can actually think. And since the artificial stupidity (AS) usually feeds the customer articles completely unrelated to the issue, anyone sufficiently ...


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The biggest risk is algorithmic bias. As more and more decision-making processes are taken on by AI systems, there will be an abdication of responsibility to the computer; people in charge will simply claim the computer did it, and they cannot change it. The real problem is that training data for machine learning often contains bias, which is usually ...


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Offloading of responsibility may the single greatest danger. Where algorithmic bias may be the core issue of Machine Learning, it can be identified and mitigated. Transferring responsibility to a robot or algorithm requires an intentional choice with moral dimension. As the scholar Joanna Bryson put it: In humans consciousness and ethics are ...


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IMHO the greatest risk is that AI can make people lazy. If you can ask an AI for an answer to any problem, what's your motivation to figure out how to figure out the answer for yourself? I have run into a lot of young people who can't add or multiply two three-digit numbers without using a calculator. When it's possible to dump a huge mass of data into an ...


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I don't think regulating something necessarily causes that regulation to defacto become a "risk". Regulation - including overregulation - may, in fact, aid in the dialogue between practitioners, which may end up educating the regulators, the public and the practitioners themselves. My answers to your survey would most likely be "it depends...", or "no risk"...


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To your first question, there are two stages that keep us far from ai realization. Stage one: gods' ai. As to say man must first conjure a way to produce something capable of reason. Stage two: mother's touch to ai. As to say, the first intelligent non-organic creature will not be as smart as its true potential. Just as we as humans must strive to realize ...


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Neither AI alignment nor AI governance are important yet. We are so far away from AGI that we don't even know what is missing. We don't set up safety instructions for interstellar travel, so why should we do it for AGI? I can also come up with a lot of dangers of that... There are real dangers of AI, though. Including societal issues: Blind trust: ...


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Countermeasures don't make much sense if the decision to deploy the countermeasures is decided online. If a hidden intelligence lives there, it would be like plotting a defense in the potential enemy's home. The proposal of collaboration wouldn't work either, since a smart artificial intelligence would see the fear under a proposal and work that into its ...


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I don't like to be a killjoy, but this question seems premature. The kinds of emergent artificial general intelligences you're talking about are really in the realm of science fiction, and most AI researchers do not think they are likely to appear anytime soon. The overwhelming majority of researchers think the most likely times to appear are "More than 50 ...


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