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No, "Google's view of AI" (which in and of itself already is kind of vague, there are plenty of people within Google who have very different ideas) has not risen to the status of universal truth. It sometimes seems that, when people don't understand something in a paper with the word Google anywhere in the authorship block, it is automatically assumed ...


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One risk that’s already realized: large online vendors think they have implemented artificial intelligence in their “help” pages and therefore they can (try to) make it impossible to get to someone who can actually think. And since the artificial stupidity (AS) usually feeds the customer articles completely unrelated to the issue, anyone sufficiently ...


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The biggest risk is algorithmic bias. As more and more decision-making processes are taken on by AI systems, there will be an abdication of responsibility to the computer; people in charge will simply claim the computer did it, and they cannot change it. The real problem is that training data for machine learning often contains bias, which is usually ...


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Short Answer: Although I agree that words can mean different things, the names of new ideas in AI are not predisposed to be adversarial but are intended to be relatable simplifications of an idea. Longer Answer: In your intro you say: Word selection matters. Sometimes we don't select well. If we are writers, we may edit a word later or the editor may, ...


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All the evidence that I have seen suggests that training in ethics has no detectable effect on the behaviour of the trained (!), and so although I sympathise with your goals, I believe the time would be better spent on technical training, the better to advance AI and, hopefully, downstream benefits like more tax revenue for ethics departments.


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Such courses and relevant studies do exist, but they are much more common at departments of Philosophy or similar places that don't really deal with the technical part of AI development. In an way, it's their job to discuss whatever hypothetical philosophical problems we can think of, so it's relevant for them. Computer science departments typically do not ...


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I tend to take a reductionist view and see economic incentives as the overwhelming driver of AI research, without regard to consequences. I see the entire field as based on optimization, which includes automation of repetitive tasks. It's about reducing cost/downside and increasing return-on-investment in any area to which intelligence can be applied, ...


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Offloading of responsibility may the single greatest danger. Where algorithmic bias may be the core issue of Machine Learning, it can be identified and mitigated. Transferring responsibility to a robot or algorithm requires an intentional choice with moral dimension. As the scholar Joanna Bryson put it: In humans consciousness and ethics are ...


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IMHO the greatest risk is that AI can make people lazy. If you can ask an AI for an answer to any problem, what's your motivation to figure out how to figure out the answer for yourself? I have run into a lot of young people who can't add or multiply two three-digit numbers without using a calculator. When it's possible to dump a huge mass of data into an ...


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A heavy problem in autonomous driving is, that the underlying technology is too advanced for 99% of the world population. What a mechanical car is, is teached in schools. It contains of a motor, brakes and a human driver. And the science of building traditional cars is teached in universities under the term mechanical engineering. That means, the first group ...


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Shannon's mouse was obsessed with the cheese, which was an obsession with winning too, just not winning by prevailing over another mouse. There was no other hungry mouse in the maze. There is a ring of truth to the idea that, as AI develops, individual AI systems will become more like minds. Artificial minds would need a healthy growing environment that ...


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To your first question, there are two stages that keep us far from ai realization. Stage one: gods' ai. As to say man must first conjure a way to produce something capable of reason. Stage two: mother's touch to ai. As to say, the first intelligent non-organic creature will not be as smart as its true potential. Just as we as humans must strive to realize ...


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Neither AI alignment nor AI governance are important yet. We are so far away from AGI that we don't even know what is missing. We don't set up safety instructions for interstellar travel, so why should we do it for AGI? I can also come up with a lot of dangers of that... There are real dangers of AI, though. Including societal issues: Blind trust: ...


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Countermeasures don't make much sense if the decision to deploy the countermeasures is decided online. If a hidden intelligence lives there, it would be like plotting a defense in the potential enemy's home. The proposal of collaboration wouldn't work either, since a smart artificial intelligence would see the fear under a proposal and work that into its ...


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I don't like to be a killjoy, but this question seems premature. The kinds of emergent artificial general intelligences you're talking about are really in the realm of science fiction, and most AI researchers do not think they are likely to appear anytime soon. The overwhelming majority of researchers think the most likely times to appear are "More than 50 ...


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