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12

Sophia uses ChatScript. You can read about what ChatScript can do here. ChatScript keeps track of conversations with each user; can record where it is in a conversational flow and what facts it has learned about a user (you have to tell it what facts to try to learn). You can optionally keep logs of the conversations (either on a ChatScript ...


9

Although there are several definitions of "robot", an essential feature of everything called "robot" is that it is capable of movement. This does not necessarily mean displacement; a robot arm in a factory also moves. There is a single exception to this rule, which is bot-programs like chatbots; I will discuss them later. Artificial Intelligence does not ...


9

There has been quite a few approaches to achieve such kind of distributed coordination. I present here one of them, for its generality and simplicity (that makes it easy to remember too). But first, the general idea behind these approaches is pretty interesting, around a mechanism called stigmergy. Stigmergy is a behaviour coordination mechanism mediated by ...


7

The Oxford study from 2013 in The future of employment paper assess this and estimated the probability of computerisation for 702 detailed occupations using a Gaussian process classifier (using job data from the UK partially merged with data from US), and based on these estimates they identified three areas of computerisation bottleneck areas and nine skills ...


5

Take a robot that we want to be able to move from the bottom right corner to the top left corner of a 4x4 matrix full of random holes it should avoid. With holes represented by 1s, it could look something like: exit \/ [0,0,0,1] [0,1,1,0] [0,1,1,1] [0,0,0,0] /\ enter As we want it to get to an exit from a start, we have a natural fitness ...


5

In the broadest sense, the difference is that non-robotic A(G)I may not be possible because, as per this question, it could be that "Intelligence requires a body". More specifically, it could be that there are limitations to what the traditional (well, 1950s style) 'Brain in a vat' notion of an AI is capable of comprehending, in the absence of experience of ...


5

I can only refer you to the wisdom contained in the Tao of Programming: A manager went to the Master Programmer and showed him the requirements document for a new application. The manager asked the Master: "How long will it take to design this system if I assign five programmers to it?" "It will take one year," said the Master promptly. "But we ...


4

What are some jobs that can never be automated? None. The key word here is "never". Technology is rapidly advancing, and while I can think of situations where jobs can't be killed in the short-term or even in the long-term, I can't think of a job that is 100%, totally immune to extinction. Surely they exist, but you can't be sure...anything can happen ...


4

English language robots which you mentioned, are called "chatter bots". Chatter Bots are used to communicate with a human and undergo conversations in such a way that the human which is communicating will think that he/she is talking to another human. There are two types of chatter bots: One is which uses certain rules and pattern matching techniques and ...


3

Some fields that humans are born with advantages: Fast and precise image processing ability. Even the stupidest human can tell the edge of two different objects precisely, e.g. which part of the image is a dog and which is a cat. Fuzzy learning ability. Humans don't need to see all kinds of cats to identify a cat. As long as we see some cats (real ones or ...


3

I think a big problem with intelligent robots is that the world is very dynamic and always changing and our techniques right now are still quite static and not really flexible. I myself come from a Computer Vision background and in this field I often see some limitations of one of the most promising approaches for AI right now (Deep Learning). For example ...


3

The "baseline humans" you describe have been historically described in the media industry as "the lowest common denominator" (LCD). The LCD is the broadest possible audience for content, traditionally for network television shows. (Before the age of cable, there were only 3 to 4 networks and all video content was broadcast over the airwaves--no way to ...


3

First Question To treat this question in a scientific way, because I think it is a reasonable enough question that draws on the realities of postmodern culture in post industrialized societies to be treated scientifically, we should define some things. The most difficult is intelligence, which is the realm in which smartness, cleverness, and stupidity ...


3

In a general sense you can say that robot is a piece of hardware, while AI is software (sometimes hardware too). Wikipedia states Robot as a machine which performs complex set of tasks automatically. Machine - A mechanical device basically. So, technically you can create a robot that doesn't require any kind of complex algorithms to take decisions. A ...


3

Just to add some discourse; this is actually an incredibly complex task, as gestures (aka kinematics) function as an auxiliary language that can completely change the meaning of a sentence or even a single word. I recently did a dissertation on the converse (generating the correct gesture from a specific social context & linguistic cues). The factors ...


2

It depends on whether the loss of the robot would end up causing harm to humans. If the robot was supposed to be watching for a suspected terrorist attack to start taking place (so it could alert authorities or halt the attack), it would be very bad if somebody dismantled the robot or otherwise stopped it from carrying out its mission. In that case, the ...


2

The question mentions "walking robot", but it may be illustrative to re-frame the discussion in terms of self-driving cars, because: It gives a common point of reference, rather than everyone having their own separate vision of how vulnerable/powerful a kung-fu walking robot might be. We already know a lot about societal attitudes to car theft. Given that ...


2

Survival, Imagining, Moral Reasoning The thing that comes to mind is a new-born, when you said "the stupidest human", and it already has some basic “survival instincts”. It will avoid pain, consume food, and quickly learn to distinguish "safe" and "dangerous" conditions and people. We have computer programs that can learn chess and calculate the optimal ...


2

Just a little bit of a glimpse. We are in this age of artificial narrow intelligence,where by many various applications are in phase of development, based on the case scenarios given in the question.ie computing power is out but not to the full requirement of artificial intelligent agent nor robot. According to the Microsoft co-founder said in MIT ...


2

I am not a professional but I have been thinking a lot about AI and neural nets, so I thought I might add my 2 ct. "Acting intelligently" or "deriving goal directed action from sensory input" is actually a lot more complex than what computer processors have been doing so far. I think we are on a good path right now, but it will still be quite a while before ...


2

I do not know the precise definition of intelligence, but from lots of people I have interacted with, they regard people as intelligent on a particular field, if and only if: They are able to take split second correct decisions in a situation in that particular field. Let us see where AI have succeeded in this case: Elon Musk’s Dota 2 AI beats the ...


1

Pepper the robot has been used to perform Buddhist funeral rights in Japan for years. See: Robopriest: Catholic church could ordain sophisticated AI ROBOTS as priests, Franciscan Sister proposes, with the church moving towards a 'post-human priesthood' (Daily Mail) The article article also discusses a sister and theologian from Catholic Church who ...


1

Can we? We do all the time. If you look at the papers that describe some of the AI systems in current use and offered as services to customers, you will find either block diagram or a description of AI component interconnections (not connections between layers but between elements where the elements are networks or other AI system components) or both. ...


1

Lost Article and Found Articles MIT Review had an article on nanotechnology for disease eradication, DNA repair, and microsurgery in the 1990s that's probably somewhere among the thousands of entries resulting from a web search of, "MIT Review nanotechnology cell repair," or the few hundred resulting from an academic article search for the same.1 The ...


1

It would probably be accurate at higher speeds, if the processing system that processes the information from the camera system can process the information in real time. It looks like it can, but you will also have to account for motion blur. If there is too much motion blur, you will probably not be able to do anything other than speeding up the camera and ...


1

Anything that can be broken into set of instructions will be automated, and contained in a narrow trajectory. But we will have the ability to deep between those different skills. Wrote more about this thinking here


1

Probably the only secure jobs are those where the audience enjoys watching live human craftsmanship take place in real time right before their eyes, like acting or standup comedy or musical virtuosity or playing a sport. Watching a robot do the same thing would be far less personally engaging since there's no human skill or artistry to appreciate or ...


1

If you were to completely automate a human, you'd just have another human, which defeats the purpose of the automation. Any job that requires a "whole human," rather than just a human's hands, feet, or simple reasoning ability, will still require humans. If I go to a shrink, one with Wikipedia-like knowledge would be great, but one that also actually knows ...


1

There is some research on this topic. See, for example, the papers Robot Identification and Localization with Pointing Gestures (2018) and Proximity Human-Robot Interaction Using Pointing Gestures and a Wrist-mounted IMU (2019), by Boris Gromov et al., where the human is assumed to possess an inertial measurement unit (IMU) attached to the arm


1

Simply we say AI is software and robot is its body. This is because the algorithms we commonly think of AI come in the form of software, where when we talk about robots, we're talking about physical automation. In an automobile manufacturing process where automation is used, the software makes the decisions on what physical action the robot arm should ...


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