11

Artificial consciousness is a challenging theoretical and engineering objective. Once that major challenge is met, the computer's conscious awareness of itself would likely be a minor addition, since the conscious computer is just another object of which its consciousness can be aware. A child can look in the mirror and recognize that moving their hands ...


5

I think this is one of the best AGI related questions I've see in this forum. I will skip all thematic about "what is an AGI", "simulation game", ... These topics have been discussed during decades and nowadays they are, in my opinion, a dead end. Thus, I can only answer with my personal experience: It is a basic theorem in computing that any number of ...


5

This is a great question, elements of which I have also been pondering on, though we are very far from being able to actually wrestle with it algorithmically. This question raises all kinds of metaphysical questions (Kant himself showed that pure reason is not sufficient for all questions, but I'm going to avoid that rabbit hole and focus on the mechanics ...


5

It may be helpful to think of consciousness, like intelligence, as a spectrum. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, under the section "Creature Consciousness" (2.1) defines sentience as: Sentience. It may be conscious in the generic sense of simply being a sentient creature, one capable of sensing and responding to its world (Armstrong 1981). ...


4

I believe you are referring to something that Arend Hintze wrote about in his article "Understanding the four types of AI, from reactive robots to self-aware beings". Here are the four types from his article: Type I AI: Reactive machines The most basic types of AI systems are purely reactive, and have the ability neither to form memories nor to use past ...


3

Good question. It is related to the genetic algorithm concept, automated bug detection, and continuous integration. Early Genetically Inspired Algorithms Some of the Cambridge LISP code in the 1990s worked deliberately toward self-improvement, which is not the same as self-repair, but the two are conceptual siblings. Some of those early LISP algorithms ...


3

Yes, this was an active area of research in a number of different AI fields. Probably the most directly related work is Bongard, Zykov & Lipson's self-repairing robots from the early 2000's. There's some more recent work from Mark Yim that you can see here too. There are lots of different ways to do this, but Bongard et al's approach was probably the ...


3

I think the most important thing is that it has to have time simulated in some way. Think self aware chatbot. Then to be "self aware" the environment could be data that is fed in through time that can be distinguished as being "self" and "other". By that I suppose I mean "self" is the part it influences directly and "other" is the part that is influenced ...


3

There are two main subjects you need to look at to understand the problem: The Turing Test The Turing test, developed by Alan Turing in 1950, is a test of a machine's ability to exhibit intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human. wiki See also: Turing Test (Stanford Philosophical Dictionary) There is a linguistic ...


2

If something is indistinguishable from a human it is as intelligent as a human. There is no such thing as simulated intelligence. Consciousness of course is a different matter and I suspect that's what you really have in mind (no pun intended). The question how to distinguish somebody who is truly conscious from somebody who just acts outwardly like a ...


2

By the cognitive science / psychology literature, we don't have a theory of consciousness, or a measure of sentience. By its very nature, "things" like those can only be understood with respect to ones own subjective experience (as in you can only understand consciousness by comparing it to your own conscious experience). So no, even if we have a device ...


2

"Consciousness" does not have a universal definition. However, if you are really into "consciousness", you should probably read about Searle's Chinese Room experiment or Marvin Minsky's society of mind. In my opinion, there are many more fundamental obstacles in current AI research that we have to tackle first. Furthermore, a more formal question would be ...


2

I think general artificial intelligence will only be possible with some form of self awareness included. Many aspects of human communication do not work if one of the communicating partners does not have self awareness. A good example are many of today's chat bots. They seem to not even hear what they say and only rarely seem to have episodic memory. ...


2

Though a good answer by @pasaba por aqui, I'd agree with @zooby that a graph might be too simplistic. If humans were in an environment where the options were drown or take 5000 unrelated steps to build a boat, we'd never have crossed any seas. I think any graph, if designed by hand, would not be complex enough to call the agent within as general AI. The ...


2

Of the answers so far, the one from @DukeZhou were the most provocative. For instance, the reference to the Chinese Room critique brings up Searle's contention that some form of intentionality might need support in the artificial environment. This might imply the necessity of a value system or a pain-pleasure system, i.e. something where good consequences ...


2

General AI can absolutely exist in a 2D world, just that a generalized AI (defined here as "consistent strength across a set of problems") in this context would still be quite distinct from an Artificial General Intelligence, defined as "an algorithm that can perform any intellectual task that a human can." Even there, the definition of AGI is fuzzy, ...


1

The question and the example are a few contradictory. The example is about a physical brain damage. Computer systems with the ability to self-repair exists from 1970's. They can repair a damaged disk (RAID), replace a CPU by an idle one (active/passive), mark faulty memory blocks, redirect network traffic from broken links to available ones, ... nowadays ...


1

In a bureaucratic world, certainly, but governmental departments and committees are not the course setters their members often believe them to be. We can begin with a quick scan for somewhat opened, global, and governmentally oriented new and evidence of projects and open or hidden agenda in play. (We can guess what lobbying and defense contracts are in ...


1

Your problem closely resembles John Searle's "Chinese Room" argument, which claimed that one (or more) abstract "intelligence tests" lack the discriminitive ability to distinguish between a trivial simulation of intelligence and The Real Thing. Thus the success of an AI at one (or more) synthetic cognitive test(s) (like the Turing Test, or the games of ...


1

Machines will never be conscious. Let's try this theoretical thought exercise. You memorize a whole bunch of shapes. Then, you memorize the order the shapes are supposed to go in, so that if you see a bunch of shapes in a certain order, you would "answer" by picking a bunch of shapes in another proper order. Now, did you just learn any meaning behind any ...


1

This question should probably be moved to worldbuilding.stackexchange … That being said, in the context of a story, I would look at something like the neural correlates of consciousness. In this book by Stanislas Dehaene the experiments are described that led to the realisation that conscious perception requires information integration in certain parts of ...


1

"A full-fledged self-aware artificial intelligence may have come to exist in a distributed environment like the internet" The question implies that this artificial intelligence has surpassed human intelligence (full fledged) and therefore, due to the concept of the intelligence explosion resulting from such a state, the AI you are looking for is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible