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It may be helpful to think of consciousness, like intelligence, as a spectrum. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, under the section "Creature Consciousness" (2.1) defines sentience as: Sentience. It may be conscious in the generic sense of simply being a sentient creature, one capable of sensing and responding to its world (Armstrong 1981). ...


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In theory, if one could build a computing device that matched or exceeded the cognitive capabilities of a sentient being, it should be possible. (Singlarity adherents believe we will one day be able to transfer the human mind into an artificial computing platform, and it logically follows that one could "hack" such a mind, or build from the ground up, to ...


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Theoretically, there shouldn't be a problem copying either of the artificial brains in any state. Difficulty in measuring a state doesn't seem to really be a problem until you get down to the quantum level, where the means of measurement affect the state. The configuration of the artificial brains, including pathway structures and states, should be ...


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Sentience is another AI term without a standard definition. It can mean that the system has sensory input, that it has emotion, or that it forms a subjective opinion on what it senses. None of these require any type of non-causal or metaphysical elements, so the limits imagined for AI by those who propose that AI will never have free will or a soul don't ...


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By the cognitive science / psychology literature, we don't have a theory of consciousness, or a measure of sentience. By its very nature, "things" like those can only be understood with respect to ones own subjective experience (as in you can only understand consciousness by comparing it to your own conscious experience). So no, even if we have a device ...


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Let start by classify the phrases you propose: The cat drinks milk. => action Sun is yellow. => descriptive/declarative, immutable I was at work yesterday. => descriptive, time related 1) The easiest ones are always the descriptive and immutable (in the context) phrases as "Sun is yellow.". Some usual representations: prolog: color('Sun',yellow). or ...


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People normally represent sentences like this as vectors of a specific length, normally about 2500 in length. The algorithm that can do this is sentence2vec. It is basically a derivative of word2vec. It allows you to train a model that can transform sentences into vectors that you can then feed into a neural network or another algorithm. You can check out ...


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Yes, an AI program can become sentient. Ray Kurzweil while giving a lecture at Singularity University on The Accelerating Future stated that human body is basically composed of approximately 23,000 little software programs called GENES. If you think about it, they are actually programs, composed of sequences of data. They are not written in C++ or Java, ...


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