2

Yes, there is research on this topic. The field that studies it is known as affective computing (AC). Emotion recognition seems to be a specific problem in affective computing, i.e. the recognition of emotions, while AC is also concerned with giving machines the ability to convey emotions (in fact, this paper differentiates the two). There's also sentiment ...


2

What you're describing is known as coreference resolution. More specifically, this example is anaphora resolution. The short answer is that this is an open research question and there is no well-established solution. You mentioned Hugging Face in your question. The neuralcoref module in spaCy is itself from Hugging Face (note the reflexive anaphor used for ...


1

Both ways are valid. It depends on what you want from the model and expect from the data. Generally though I would use 1 assumption and stick with it (unless there was a specific reason not to), so I would use all lines for test if training done that way, and same for majority. Also note if you ever get more than 3 people, you can choose to do a variance ...


1

Yes, there is. You can try Spacy. Here you go. import spacy from spacytextblob.spacytextblob import SpacyTextBlob nlp = spacy.load('en_core_web_sm') spacy_text_blob = SpacyTextBlob() nlp.add_pipe(spacy_text_blob) text = "i'm good" doc = nlp(text) print(doc._.sentiment.polarity) # 0.7 text = "i'm bad" doc = nlp(text) print(doc._....


1

There are many ways to solve this problem. One way is to apply stemming or lemmatization to reduce your words. Using NLTK's Porter stemmer for example on healthy, healthier, healthiest, not healthy, more healthy, and zero healthy gives: healthi , healthier , healthiest , not healthi , more healthi , zero healthi This can help make word comparisons easier. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible