24

If I'm not mistaken you're looking for Roko's Basilisk, in which an otherwise benevolent future AI system tortures simulations of those who did not work to bring the system into existence


21

The technological singularity is a theoretical point in time at which a self-improving artificial general intelligence becomes able to understand and manipulate concepts outside of the human brain's range, that is, the moment when it can understand things humans, by biological design, can't. The fuzziness about the singularity comes from the fact that, from ...


11

Neural networks, deep learning and other supervised learning algorithms do not "take actions" by themselves, they lack agency. However, it is relatively easy to give a machine agency, as far as taking actions is concerned. That is achieved by connecting inputs to some meaningful data source in the environment (such as a camera, or the internet), and ...


10

I believe the term you are looking for is "(technological) singularity". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technological_singularity


9

I quite like your outlook, and without getting into the details of how a "singularity" may be effected which is covered in numerous other questions, or how consciousness and "omniscience" come into play because consciousness and omniscience are not requirements, I will instead direct you to two key philosophers: Phillip K. Dick, for whom the central theme ...


9

Some AI researchers do think RL is a path to AGI, and your intuition about how an agent would need to be proactive in selecting actions to learn about is exactly the area these researchers are now focused on. Much of the work in this area is focused on the idea of curiosity, and since 2014 this idea has gained a lot of traction in the research community. ...


8

I can say that among AI researchers I interact with, it far more common to view it as wild speculation than as settled fact. This is borne out by surveys of AI researchers, with 80% thinking strong forms of AI will emerge in "more than 50 years" or "never", and just a few percent thinking that such forms of AI are "near". Software Developers are not the ...


6

The likely expression you are looking for is AI takeover, which is a common topic in science fiction movies, such as 2001: A Space Odyssey and The Matrix, and popular culture. Although the AI takeover is an unlikely scenario in the next years, certain scientists, such as Stephen Hawking, have expressed concerns about it and some philosophers, especially Nick ...


4

That would be a no for speed or strength, if you have a super strong entity but it cannot research new materials, it will be quickly limited, same thing for speed, Basically, you need something out of their field to improve them, which makes a runaway improvement impossible. Though, we already have super strong and super fast machines, those are cars, ...


4

Given all your assumptions about AI turn out to be true, we would have some kind of utopia, where no one has to work, and there is plenty of everything. Fair enough. Your other assumptions is about human nature, and that is where I'd challenge your conclusion: Just because there are computers better than humans at some task, that does not automatically take ...


3

We are biological beings. We will continue to like whatever activates opioid receptors and we will continue to want whatever activates dopamine receptors in the nucleus accumbens. Food, drinks, sex, social dominance, altruistic acts, novelty, drugs of abuse, physical mastery, procreation, socializing, nice sunny weather, sleep when tired, etc, will continue ...


3

The short answer, i think, is that it cannot. The AI system will only do, and it will only be good at the task that the programmer made it for. Of course you could have an AI that, for example, can trigger a prediction on the input with different models depending on some other variables, but that will still be based on what the programmer wrote, it will ...


3

There is at least one very important and serious AI scientist that apparently believes in the creation of true artificial general intelligence and possibly superintelligence: Jürgen Schmidhuber, who is the co-author of the LSTM, among many other important contributions. In fact, he recently founded NNAISENSE for this ultimate purpose, that is, to build a ...


3

The singularity, in the context of AI, is a theoretical event whereby an intelligent system with the following criteria is deployed. Capable of improving the range of its own intelligence or deploying another system with such improved range Willing or compelled to do so Able to do so in the absence of human supervision The improved version sustains criteria ...


3

The concept of "the singularity" is when machines outsmart the humans. Although Stephen Hawking opinion is that this situation is inevitable, but I think it'll be very difficult to reach that point, because every A.I. algorithm needs to be programmed by humans, therefore it would be always more limited than its creator. We would probably know when that ...


2

If the technological singularity always leads to the extinction of all intelligent life, then yes. If the technological singularity always leads to intelligent life migrating into higher planes of existence that aren't accessible to us right now, then also yes. Otherwise it is exactly the assumption of unbridled technological progress that makes the Fermi ...


2

Assuming super-intelligence is possible, the answer is probably yes and no. Yes in Kurzweil-like scenarios, where super-intelligence is an extension of human beings by technology (we are already in to some extent). Then control follows, as super-intelligence depends on us. It would extend our capabilities, such as speed of processing, extent of processing, ...


2

Note that the statement says nothing directly about the limit of intelligence, nor even about the limit of computational intelligence - but about the limit of computing power. Perhaps the sentence "the speed of light puts a strict upper bound on how much computing can be done" needs a better explanation: The authors are probably referring to Bremermann's ...


2

Impending or Past? Niel Postman, in his book, Technopoly, argues the preemption of human centered culture to technically driven culture has already occurred. Jaques Ellul, in his book, Technological Society, heaped evidence behind the proposal that technology became autonomous centuries ago. Their arguments are convincing. Some think other criteria must ...


2

What you are talking about is known as the Control Problem. We have our own tag for this specific topic here, which you can use for this and similar questions. How to address the control problem is heavily discussed and still considered unsolved. Two of the important approaches are motivation control and capability control. Motivation control aims at ...


2

May not be quite what you’re looking for, but nonetheless helpful, I hope. The White House a year ago commissioned a report on AI that touches briefly on policy issues.


2

Starting from Arne's point on photography: I'd like to point out how photography changed painting. You can notice that classical painting that tried to be photorealistic stopped to be relevant when photography started, and that several modern movements started, like more abstract paintings, surrealism, or cubism. One can see art as a medium to brag "i'm ...


2

The definition of "technological singularity" answers the question: The technological singularity (also, simply, the singularity) is the hypothesis that the invention of artificial superintelligence will abruptly trigger runaway technological growth, resulting in unfathomable changes to human civilization. (wiki) note the order of facts is "...


1

You invoke it in a loop. Imagine a digital assistant responding to voice queries. It might look something like this: for(;;) { var audio = RecordSomeAudio(); var response = model.predict(audio); if(response.action == "SAYSOMETHING") { PlaySomeAudio(response.output); } } Note that the model gets invoked repeatedly and can decide in a given ...


1

No, we're still very far away from Singularity or Terminator's Skynet. Put in very simple terms: A machine learning software that can create self-learning code is completely unaware of it's environment and thus will just see the world through the sensors it has, available to perceive it only that way, and in this case it's just files and code based on it's ...


1

Your point about acceleration of "monkeying around" via Machine Learning is a good one. In the past, we've only had millions of humans messing around with technology and nature to "see what happens" when you do this or that. (The case could be made that this is not random, rather it results from conscious intentionality, but I'm not fully convinced it's ...


1

Your analogy is wrong , in the infinite monkey theorem , the monkey randomly types some characters let us put it in a more formal way . consider a perfect random bit generator , which randomly generates bits , then if we take a string 'x' on a long run the generator somehow generates 'x' since it has to go through all possible (infinite) combinations in a ...


1

Moore's Law is the most famous example, breaking it down from the standpoint of computing power. Here, specifically, Moore's is talking about one of the "bounds of rationality" in regard to problems solving / solution checking. "His reasoning was a log-linear relationship between device complexity (higher circuit density at reduced cost) and time" ...


1

infinite being, eternal, supernatural and existing by itself, necessary cause and ultimate end of all that exists As the Portuguese dictionary says, the problem of calling God is the connection with spirituality, it is even strange to call a machine of God. Now, we can put Google as an example. They know what you do, where you are, what you like and what ...


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