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20

You don't necessarily have to analyse it all. Just by having such data available you can achieve a lot in terms of surveillance, as long as you can retrieve relevant parts. A few years ago there was a Radiolab podcast, "The Eye in the Sky" (there's a full transcript on the site). The basic idea is that you have a plane circling a city 24/7, and filming what ...


9

You would also want to consider physical limitations. If you are even storing 126 yottabyte of data per day, then if we look at the current theoretical densest data storage medium, DNA, at 215 petabytes per gram, we get... ${(126 * 10^{24}) \over (215 * 10^{15})} = 586046511$ grams per day 586046511 g = 586046 kg = 586 Metric Tonnes just for storage.


8

The answer is really very simple. If you have the dystopian power over all the mobile devices in the first place, you would not make them send all their data over to any "global data storage" just like that. Instead, you would have put a local AI on each device that filters, processes, categorizes and flags the important parts, sending only those parts plus ...


4

The paper The role of artificial intelligence in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (2020, published in Nature) should contain the information you're looking for. In the introduction, the authors write Here we present and discuss implications of how AI can either enable or inhibit the delivery of all 17 goals and 169 targets recognized in the ...


4

The great acting teacher Stella Adler wrote about mannerisms being a powerful tool for actors. Method acting in general focuses on natural performances based roughly on understanding the mindset of the character portrayed. It's possible actors who have portrayed androids have observed industrial robots to inform their physicality, and many performances ...


4

I am unsure about the cyberpunk portion of this, but there has been an extensive feminist literature developed under the topic of "Gynoids" and the gendering of robots and other forms of AI (like virtual assistants). These papers tend to argue that the choice of gender assigned by AI developers to their creations is reflective of implicit social views and ...


4

I will interpret the questions as being about triage. This is particularly important in crisis situations, where a lot of such life-or-death decisions have to be taken. In the START system there are four different categories: the deceased, who are beyond help the injured who could be helped by immediate transportation the injured with less severe injuries ...


3

At face value, this sound monstrous--a measure to offload responsibility to a non-conscious mechanism that cannot be meaningfully punished for mistakes. However, I will argue: There is humane benefit in taking this decision out of the hands of doctors re: the psychological toll Specifically, doctors are not the reason for resource scarcity, yet they're ...


3

Oliver's answer is interesting and it provides valuable information (such as a brief description of the triage process, which I was not aware of), but I disagree with his conclusion or, at least, I think it can be misleading because he is implying it's "more ethical" because the AI will behave in "more principled way". It depends on your ...


3

I disagree with the idea that a trained Machine Learning model would be impartial. Models are trained on data sets that contain features. Humans prepare those data sets and decide what features are included in the data set. The model only knows what it is trained on. Human bias is still there just less blatantly obvious. To address your question directly, ...


3

The biggest risk is algorithmic bias. As more and more decision-making processes are taken on by AI systems, there will be an abdication of responsibility to the computer; people in charge will simply claim the computer did it, and they cannot change it. The real problem is that training data for machine learning often contains bias, which is usually ...


3

According to the Baidu Research's blog post How Baidu is harnessing the power of AI in the battle against coronavirus (12-03-2020), there are already some artificial intelligence tools or algorithms being used to fight the coronavirus. Given that I cannot confirm that these AI tools and algorithms I will mention are really being used in practice, I will only ...


2

One risk that’s already realized: large online vendors think they have implemented artificial intelligence in their “help” pages and therefore they can (try to) make it impossible to get to someone who can actually think. And since the artificial stupidity (AS) usually feeds the customer articles completely unrelated to the issue, anyone sufficiently ...


2

The paper Fair and Unbiased Algorithmic Decision Making: Current State and Future Challenges argues that ensuring fairness is not a trivial task and that the current statistical formalizations of fairness lead to a long list of criteria that are each flawed (or even harmful) in different contexts, that is, there are trade-offs between the proposed ...


2

Here is an initial list of AI systems that used neural networks and have achieved human-level or superhuman performance. All of these systems are reinforcement learning systems that play videogames. AlphaGo and AlphaGo Zero (an improved version of AlphaGo that does not use human knowledge but learns by playing against itself) have achieved superhuman ...


1

AlphaDogfight - from Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) a programme that pitted computers using F-16 flight simulators against one another and later went on to defeat Air Force’s top F-16 fighter pilots. Check out this and this news and events by DARPA.


1

Here is something I've noticed about humans: We're bad at projecting the future with all of its 2nd, 3rd ... N order effects, and we're REALLY bad a projecting and quantifying risk. So, I'm not sure that you'll get an answer that is anything more than either trivially true ("Chatbots will be commonplace") or a correct but wasn't justified ("We'...


1

Not really something that slows it down but currently Mauricio Santillana at Harvard is working on modeling the pandemic and has shared some of his approaches. He explained that they have used google search trends to try to predict the number of actual cases (there is a delay between people being sick and getting tested). Looking for search terms like, "how ...


1

Disclaimer: The intent of this answer is to suggest a a parallel between methods of acting and machine learning, both in intent and application, and theory. A large number of links are included for the convenience of readers new to the field, and there is not an exact correspondence of AI concepts to acting preparation techniques. In my prior answer, I ...


1

Offloading of responsibility may the single greatest danger. Where algorithmic bias may be the core issue of Machine Learning, it can be identified and mitigated. Transferring responsibility to a robot or algorithm requires an intentional choice with moral dimension. As the scholar Joanna Bryson put it: In humans consciousness and ethics are ...


1

IMHO the greatest risk is that AI can make people lazy. If you can ask an AI for an answer to any problem, what's your motivation to figure out how to figure out the answer for yourself? I have run into a lot of young people who can't add or multiply two three-digit numbers without using a calculator. When it's possible to dump a huge mass of data into an ...


1

I don't think regulating something necessarily causes that regulation to defacto become a "risk". Regulation - including overregulation - may, in fact, aid in the dialogue between practitioners, which may end up educating the regulators, the public and the practitioners themselves. My answers to your survey would most likely be "it depends...", or "no risk"...


1

[Warning: This answer contains religious content; and it is very likely it will offend some folks.] The use of technology within religion is deeply controversial. Reformists and liberals are more open to it. Religion is a private and personal matter. I've decided to give examples rather than explain the theory behind this because of the sensitivity of this ...


1

Pepper the robot has been used to perform Buddhist funeral rights in Japan for years. See: Robopriest: Catholic church could ordain sophisticated AI ROBOTS as priests, Franciscan Sister proposes, with the church moving towards a 'post-human priesthood' (Daily Mail) The article article also discusses a sister and theologian from Catholic Church who ...


1

Upgrade This film depicts a very plausible near future when drones oversee our lives (e.g. the police use them to fight crime) and common people possess self-driving cars. This is definitely one of the best science fiction movies I have ever watched in my entire life, and I have watched many, such as 2001, Blade Runner, or The Matrix. In fact, these are the ...


1

Artificial intelligence and, in particular, machine learning (ML) and evolutionary algorithms are already being used to automate the task of software development and, in particular, software testing. For example, take a look at the paper An empirical evaluation of evolutionary algorithms for unit test suite generation (2018). There are other examples, such ...


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