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The technological singularity is a theoretical point in time at which a self-improving artificial general intelligence becomes able to understand and manipulate concepts outside of the human brain's range, that is, the moment when it can understand things humans, by biological design, can't. The fuzziness about the singularity comes from the fact that, from ...


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I quite like your outlook, and without getting into the details of how a "singularity" may be effected which is covered in numerous other questions, or how consciousness and "omniscience" come into play because consciousness and omniscience are not requirements, I will instead direct you to two key philosophers: Phillip K. Dick, for whom the central theme ...


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I can say that among AI researchers I interact with, it far more common to view it as wild speculation than as settled fact. This is borne out by surveys of AI researchers, with 80% thinking strong forms of AI will emerge in "more than 50 years" or "never", and just a few percent thinking that such forms of AI are "near". Software Developers are not the ...


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OpenCog is an open source AGI project. But it is is also incredibly complex and IMHO not a good idea (I have not fully read his theories). You can learn the essential ideas behind OpenCog from the co-founder Ben Goertzel site as well. Or, you can participate in the philosophical discussion regarding AGI. For strictly AGI, decision theory, logic, and math ...


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That would be a no for speed or strength, if you have a super strong entity but it cannot research new materials, it will be quickly limited, same thing for speed, Basically, you need something out of their field to improve them, which makes a runaway improvement impossible. Though, we already have super strong and super fast machines, those are cars, ...


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I'm going to refer you to one of my favorite AI philosophers, Phillip K. Dick, who thought deeply on this subject and wrote about in some detail in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. Essentially, replicants (artificial humans) had a design flaw--they lacked empathy. This flaw was allowed to persist because it had a useful side-effect in that replicants ...


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The state of AGI research is pursuing the few problems that we have been able to break off from the gigantic research problem. These are terms which can be more thoroughly looked into. A few of the main focuses are: One Shot learning - You know how a person can sometimes learn to do something by something by seeing literally 1 example of it? Well current ...


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Excellent question. Suppose that artificial consciousness does exist in the future. Let's call it Aiwyn (as in “I win” and “AI win”). Now, the question is what will Aiwyn do and why? To answer this question, we need to understand the theory of infinite games. James P. Carse, a professor emeritus of history and literature of religion ...


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I think most answers that come to mind are going to be connected to the control problem in some way---e.g. sandboxing frameworks, AI behavior monitoring protocols, etc. However, if you aren't interested in those for now, that pretty much leaves two possible needs such technology could satisfy: the technical challenges of AI itself, and the need to optimize ...


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Title Question Easily. Simply define the efficiency metric to favor speed and accuracy in mail sorting, high speed trading, predicting movie box office revenue, or chess playing and you're done. If you define efficiency as the number of days required to write a textbook without any feedback from faculty or students divided by the number of pages, then the ...


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Metaphorically: make it so depressed it commits suicide. As per my answer to this AI SE question, the idea is to feed it a sequence of inputs that will cause it to become (permanently) inactive. The technical details of how this might be achieved (and they are somewhat technical) can be found in this paper.


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This is a purely theoretical question, currently in the realm of philosophy and speculative fiction. Nevertheless, it is an interesting question, and may be instructive. If we use the standard definition of Artificial General Intelligence as automata with human level intelligence, then they could certainly devise their own communications protocols, just ...


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There are basically two worries: If we create an AGI that is a slightly better AGI-programmer than its creators, it might be able to improve its own source code to become even more intelligent. Which would enable it to improve its source code even more etc. Such a selfimproving seed AI might very quickly become superintelligent. The other scenario is that ...


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The concept of "the singularity" is when machines outsmart the humans. Although Stephen Hawking opinion is that this situation is inevitable, but I think it'll be very difficult to reach that point, because every A.I. algorithm needs to be programmed by humans, therefore it would be always more limited than its creator. We would probably know when that ...


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The singularity, in the context of AI, is a theoretical event whereby an intelligent system with the following criteria is deployed. Capable of improving the range of its own intelligence or deploying another system with such improved range Willing or compelled to do so Able to do so in the absence of human supervision The improved version sustains criteria ...


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Judea Pearl's 2018 comment on ACM.org, in his To Build Truly Intelligent Machines, Teach Them Cause and Effect is piercing truth. All the impressive achievements of deep learning amount to just curve fitting. It may be less sensational and more technically correct to state that it is not, "Just curve fitting," but rather, "sophisticated surface fitting." ...


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There is at least one very important and serious AI scientist that apparently believes in the creation of true artificial general intelligence and possibly superintelligence: Jürgen Schmidhuber, who is the co-author of the LSTM, among many other important contributions. In fact, he recently founded NNAISENSE for this ultimate purpose, that is, to build a ...


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I believe this argument is based on the fact that intelligence is a single dimension when it really isn't. Are machines and humans really on the same level if a machine can solve a complex problem in a millionth of the time a human can? It also assumes that the Turing machine is still the best computational model for the time period that you are in, which ...


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If an AI is developed by humans, we surely can create another one! Develop another AI agent without all the possible bugs that can make it go rogue to tackle the rogue AI, but more technically advanced than the previous one. Hardwire it with the sole purpose of disabling any rogue AI agent that can harm humanity and have it self-destruct in case it is ...


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Nuke it from orbit - it's the only way to be sure If you want to be really sure you destroy everything of the AI, you'll need to launch an EMP (ElectroMagneticPulse) from the orbit (there are different ways to achieve this, one would be an atomic bomb, but there are better ones). EMPs will destroy every electronic device it hits without causing really much ...


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Regarding Artificial General Intelligence, which does not currently exist and is still highly theoretical, this cannot be determined at this time. What I would say is that "strong narrow AI" has already proven the ability to become "smarter" than it's creators in specific tasks. (See Alphago, etc.) Under the idea that some form of AGI might come out of an ...


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Note that the statement says nothing directly about the limit of intelligence, nor even about the limit of computational intelligence - but about the limit of computing power. Perhaps the sentence "the speed of light puts a strict upper bound on how much computing can be done" needs a better explanation: The authors are probably referring to Bremermann's ...


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I believe that some work by Randall Beer in the 1990s demonstrated that even simple agents could learn a shared communication protocol: Computational and dynamical languages for autonomous agents Viewed in general terms, a sentence uttered by an agent is just another 'feature' of the environment, from the perspective of an observing agent. Learning to ...


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The definition of "technological singularity" answers the question: The technological singularity (also, simply, the singularity) is the hypothesis that the invention of artificial superintelligence will abruptly trigger runaway technological growth, resulting in unfathomable changes to human civilization. (wiki) note the order of facts is "...


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Of course the intelligence of a product is limited by the intelligence of its creator. Just not to the intelligence of its creator. That would be about as reasonable as the idea that the speed of a car is limited to the speed of its creator. Or the playing strength of a chess program to the Elo of its creator. Or the ability of a neural network to ...


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If certain philosophers are correct, Artificial General Intelligence will be, like fusion power, "always twenty years away". For the true believers, it is an inevitability, and opinions vary. It may be most useful to look at the unreliability human predictions in this area. There was an article in the MIT Tech Review in 2017 that contained this graphic,...


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The world seems to be operating under the "law of maximum intelligence" (I made this up), which is that the species with the most intelligence get to realise its preferences the most strongly. Put another way, the more intelligent you are, the more the world takes the shape of what you want; and this happens through your actions upon the world. This is ...


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infinite being, eternal, supernatural and existing by itself, necessary cause and ultimate end of all that exists As the Portuguese dictionary says, the problem of calling God is the connection with spirituality, it is even strange to call a machine of God. Now, we can put Google as an example. They know what you do, where you are, what you like and what ...


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You can contribute to AGI research in several ways. Write papers for the Artificial General Intelligence conference, which is peer-reviewed, or other AGI conferences or journals, or just submit them to e.g. Arxiv. For example, you can write papers about AGI algorithms or architectures. Contribute to (open source) AGI systems, like OpenCog, BECCA or OpenNARS....


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I highly suggest you read Hannu Rajaneimi's Quantum Thief trilogy, William Gibson's Neuromancer trilogy, and Phillip K. Dick's Do Android's Dream of Electric Sheep, Isaac Asimov's I, Robot. It's a nuanced subject, and no one knows. The most credible scenarios I've found for the destruction of humanity by automata involves not high-intelligence, but very ...


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