19

Architectures for recognizing and generating emotion are typically somewhat complex and don't generally have short descriptions, so it's probably better to reference the literature rather than give a misleading soundbite: Some of the early work in affective computing was done by Rosamund Picard. There is a research group at MIT specializing in this area. ...


16

The rhetorical point of the Turing Test is that it places the 'test' for 'humanity' in observable outcomes, instead of in internal components. If you would behave the same in interacting with an AI as you would with a person, how could you know the difference between them? But that doesn't mean it's reliable, because intelligence has many different ...


10

The problem of the Turing Test is that it tests the machines ability to resemble humans. Not necessarily every form of AI has to resemble humans. This makes the Turing Test less reliable. However, it is still useful since it is an actual test. It is also noteworthy that there is a prize for passing or coming closest to passing the Turing Test, the Loebner ...


9

The "Turing Test" is generally taken to mean an updated version of the Imitation Game Alan Turing proposed in his 1951 paper of the same name. An early version had a human (male or female) and a computer, and a judge had to decide which is which, and what gender they were if human. If they were correct less than 50% then the computer was considered "...


8

Yes, although how useful this AI can be is another question entirely. mpgac is a "minimally intelligent AGI" trained on the GAC-80K corpus of MIST questions. As a result, it should be able to "minimally" pass this test. However, being trained on the GAC-80K corpus obviously make it lacking for any practical purposes. From the README: Obviously this ...


7

What 'infinite' means here could possibly be debated at some length, but that notwithstanding, here are two conflicting answers: 'Yes': Simulate all possible universes. Stop when you get to one containing a flavor of intelligence that passes whatever test you have in mind. Steven Wolfram has suggested something broadly along these lines. Problem: the state ...


7

The classical Turing Test certainly does have limitations. Because I don't see it mentioned here yet, I'll suggest you read about The Chinese Room, which is one of the most commonly cited reasons why the Turing Test indeed falls short of ascertaining true 'consciousness'. However, I'd also note that Turing himself, in the original paper that proposed the ...


6

As for your comment about a computer program showing lower emotional intelligence, you may find Eliza (which you can try here) interesting. It is classical in the history of AI and pretends to mimic an analyst (psychology). However, I think your question fits nowadays more in the field of Human-Robot Interaction, which relies largely on vision for ...


5

No one has attempted to make a system that could pass a serious Turing test. All the systems that are claimed to have "passed" Turing tests have done so with low success rates simulating "special" people. Even relatively sophisticated systems like Siri and learning systems like Cleverbot are trivially stumped. To pass a real Turing test, you would both ...


5

There are many definitions of Artificial Intelligence out in the wild. All these definitions are part of one (or more) of the areas. There are four main domains, and the picture below will shed some light over this. Turing Test revolves around the left side of the cardinality, which is mostly concerned with how humans think or act. But, we know that this is ...


5

In 1986, the first PC therapist program was written by Joseph Weintraub. This program won the first Loebner Prize in 1991, and then again in 1992, 1993 and 1995. In 1981 or 1982, Jabberwacky was founded, which is the foundation of the current Cleverbot. Jabberwacky appeared on the internet in 1997, reaching the third place for the Loebner Prize in 2003, ...


5

I find it unlikely that you'll find a firm answer, so I will try my best to guide you towards information which may help you form an opinion either way. Turing had the controversial opinion (which remains controversial today) that: Digital computers have often been described as mechanical brains. Most scientists probably regard this description as a ...


4

The well-known 'Eliza' program (Weizenbaum, ~1964) would appear to be the first. Eliza was designed to model the emotionally-neutral response of a psychotherapist and this masks some of the weaknesses of its limited underlying pattern-matching mechanisms.


4

The 2016 finals haven't started yet, they will start on Saturday, 17 September 2016. In the 2015 finals or before that, nobody won the Gold Medal or the Silver Medal. The most up-to-date data can be found here, where we can find both the results from 2015 and the timeline of the 2016 contest.


4

We're definitely nowhere near that level of AI; at best, high-tech solutions like deep convolutional neural nets can help with image recognition and some other algorithms can perform things like robotic movement adequately enough to be useful in some scenarios. None of this is even as sophisticated as the behavior of a flea, but no one refers to insects as "...


4

There are three cases in which it is easily possible to distinguish strong AI play from strong human play: The AI is playing at super human skill level This seems obvious, but I want to mention it for the sake of completeness. The current skill ceiling of top level chess is well known and an opponent playing way above this skill ceiling must either be an ...


4

AI programs that exist in today's world fall into the category of Narrow Intelligence. Narrow Intelligence are easy to distinguish when compared to General Intelligence (ones that resemble more like humans). Highly advanced AI can often resemble to act like humans thought. I will like to talk about Deep Blue here. Garry Kasparov, in a series of matches ...


4

Can a brain be intelligent without a body? No. Don't forget that the main function of the brain is to provide homeostasis between the body and the environment. Without the body, the utility of the brain is no longer relevant. Alternatively, why consider intelligence only in the brain? How far does our body extend? Embodied cognitive science asks us to ...


3

Not sure if you've gone through FAIR's blog post about these negotiating bots and the research behind them. Did the Facebook robots both want everything but the balls? Yes. You are right. You can refer to the gif in FAIR's blog post. Here, the chat goes on between 2 bots, where one wants only balls, and the other offers 1 ball and a hat. And this bot re-...


3

I like your choice of "induce" instead of "produce," because the delusions came from the users. This means the answer has to do mostly with human psychology; people come equipped with lots of mental machinery specialized for dealing with other humans and not very much mental machinery specialized for dealing with software. So ELIZA behaved in ways that some ...


3

It depends on how the test is given. For example, when people claimed that a machine had successfully passed the Turing Test a few years ago, the criteria was pretty weak. It only had to fool 30% of the people for 5 minutes. That's not much of a test. To put this in perspective you probably wouldn't detect schizophrenia, autism, learning disabilities, or ...


3

Essentially yes. The Turing Test is essentially a benchmark or challenge problem. It is a task that AI researchers would like to be able to solve. Machine learning is a technique. It is a tool developed by AI researchers to solve various problems. Some kinds of machine learning are applicable to the Turing Test, but others are not. Machine learning is also ...


3

No, AiAngel is not a bot. It's Rouge's software that changes his voice along with facial recognition software which tracks his movement and copies it to the avatar. That being said, he has created a very entertaining channel and line of work for himself. By looking at the videos, you can see that he is a true genius at work. Single handedly puts on all hats ...


3

In the standard Turing test (or imitation game), the interrogator can ask multiple arbitrary questions, while, in the case of captchas, usually, there's only one question or problem. Additionally, in the Turing test, the interrogator interactively communicates with both a human and the AI at the same (in the original imitation game, the interrogator needs to ...


3

The general notion of Turing test requires human judges to (a) hold the actual conversation and (b) determine whether they think they've been conversing with another human or a machine. It also requires some human participants to present the "alternative" conversations to which the tested machines/systems would be compared. It's not a test that can be ...


3

The Turing test is a test proposed by Alan Turing (one of the founders of computer science and artificial intelligence), described in section 1 of paper Computing Machinery and Intelligence (1950), to answer the question Can machines think? More precisely, the Turing test was originally framed as an interactive quiz (denoted as the imitation game by Turing)...


2

Is the Turing Test, or any of its variants, a reliable test of artificial intelligence? Myopia Yes, if one defines the term Artificial Intelligence in terms of Alan Turing's Imitation Game or one of its variants. The approach may be, at the same time, both valid and very limited as a definition of intelligence as people interpreted the word before AI ...


2

I believe this is exactly the kind of test where Doug Lenat's cyc would do very well at ? But I can't answer the question : how much of that corpus could it answer correctly ? Probably quite a lot ! (and how many humans could pass that test ? probably not all of them, but many can...) [but is cyc considered an AI? probably not... so I may be out of topic. ...


2

There are really two questions here, that I can see. One is "what were the specific requirements of the original Turing test, as stated by Turing himself?" The other is "What should the specific requirements of a modern Turing test be?" Things have advanced a lot since Turing's day, and I think it's reasonable for us to consider extending/modifying his test ...


2

Infinite computational power in the absence of training data implies nothing beyond the ability to solve equations. In order to implement a behavior, criteria of success and failure are essential. A small bootstrap loss function with an adaptive feedback loop allowing its elaboration, infinite training data, and AIXI or Solomonoff induction would suffice, ...


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