4

In machine learning, the term bias can refer to at least 2 related concepts A (learnable) parameter of a model, such as a linear regression model, which allows you to learn a shifted function. For example, in the case of a linear regression model $y = f(x) = mx + b$, the bias $b$ allows you to shift the straight-line up an down: without the bias, you would ...


3

When ever you are buliding a ML Model don't take accuracy seriously(Mistake done by Netflix that cost them alot), you should try to get the hit scores as they will help you to know how many times your model worked on real world users.However, if your model must have to measure the accuracy try it with the RMSE score as it will penalise you more for being ...


2

Normalise your inputs. Neural networks work poorly outside of relatively small numerical ranges on input. An ideal range is for each feature to be drawn from $\mathcal{N}(0,1)$ i.e. a Normal distribution with mean $0$ and standard deviation $1$. In your case, divide both parts of $\mathbf{x}$ by $25$ and subtract $1$ would probably suffice. Your neural ...


1

You should at least crop the plots and add a legend. Maybe also provide some scores (accuracy, auc, whatever you're using). Anyway, it doesn't look your model is underfitting, if it was you should have high error at both, training and test phase and the lines would not cross.


1

I would say that your intuition is correct: the model associated with the first plot is likely to generalise more than the one associated with the second plot. In both cases, it doesn't seem that your model has overfitted the training data. Overfitting often occurs when the training error keeps decreasing but the validation error starts to increase. In both ...


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