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There is a problem with confining Artificial Intelligence to a single definition, because it has become an umbrella term encompassing many fields of science. It has come a long way from the "thinking machines" of the 50s. Actually, the term was coined in a summer workshop in 1956, whose proposal was: The study is to proceed on the basis of the conjecture ...


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So if I understood correctly: You have data from 2 sensors in time: Ar flow and BackGas Flow (SCCM, what is that?) You have that data for multiple products. 1 - Since it is relatively low dimensional, you may try using raw data with K-Means or Self Organizing Maps. 2 - If you searching for anomalies in time, you might try using feature engineering with ...


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In graph clustering, we want to cluster the nodes of a given graph, such that nodes in the same cluster are highly connected (by edges) and nodes in different clusters are poorly or not connected at all. A simple (hierarchical and divisive) algorithm to perform clustering on a graph is based on first finding the minimum spanning tree of the graph (using e....


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I found the following detailed and well documented Python notebook, which uses only NumPy.


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If I understand correctly you want to find companies with similar patterns to yours. I would start with measuring cosine similarity between your company and others. It is really easy with Python, for example: In [21]: from sklearn.metrics.pairwise import cosine_similarity In [22]: cosine_similarity([[1,4,2,6], [1,9,5,4]]) Out[22]: array([[1. , 0....


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I would recommend a hierarchical cluster algorithm, after normalising your numbers into proportions. Then the clustering should be able to identify similar patterns. Depending at which level you make the cut, you can decide how many clusters you want. A great resource on this topic is Kaufman, L., & Roussew, P. J. (1990). "Finding Groups in Data - An ...


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If your anomalies are simply peaks, why should you be using machine learning methods? You could use peak detection algorithms for the purpose. If you still insist on ML, isolation forest is a good try.


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The paper Fair and Unbiased Algorithmic Decision Making: Current State and Future Challenges argues that ensuring fairness is not a trivial task and that the current statistical formalizations of fairness lead to a long list of criteria that are each flawed (or even harmful) in different contexts, that is, there are trade-offs between the proposed ...


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The principal components (eigenvectors) correspond to the direction (in the original n-dimensional space) with the greatest variance in the data. The corresponding eigenvalue is a number that indicates how much variance there is in the data along that eigenvector (or principal component). Thus, feature 2 is the most important (based on ...


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When you say likelihood, you are invoking several other concepts like events, sample, parameters, model, probability density function (PDF), etc (it would be helpful if you learn more about these concepts). In essence, a likelihood function $l(x|\theta)$ is a PDF that quantifies how likely is that event $x$ happens out of a set of possible events, given the ...


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The first place I would have directed you would be Sklearn and pydiffmap. I found this paper specifically about the problem you are doing using python the reference a package called megaman It seems like an active Github . I suggest not just looking at manifold learning papers but leaning towards a search toward non linear embedding or non linear ...


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The impossibility is referring how to learn the disentangled representations from the observed distribution or to know whether you have a disentangled representation in the first place. Basically, an unsupervised learning agent tasked with learning a disentangled transformation of some features $\mathbf{z}$ needs to infer a set of features from the data ...


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Its not required, you can have $m=1$, actually it can be any number $\geq 1$. Now the better question is why to have it? The answer is that it adds a smoothing effect. Lets look at it in each of the limits ($\lim m \rightarrow 1$ and $\lim m \rightarrow \infty$) Towards $\infty$, it makes $u_{ij}$ equal to $\frac{1}{c}$, making each point have equal ...


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Kohonen networks by definition are single layer FCNN's, but what differentiates them from others is their unsupervised training procedure. This procedure is a function of the input, the weights and some hyperparameters. This means if you have a multilayer network you could train only the final layers weights using this procedure. Think of it this way, ...


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I have not worked on this but I think I can give you a theoretical perspective of using VAE's. Regression is a Supervised Learning task and is basically a mapping from Input to Output where the Neural Net will approximate the function $f(input) = output$. VAE's on the other hand are good for finding how a latent variable affects the output. For example, if ...


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Hierarchical Temporal Memory is a model well suited for anomaly detection. It is also pretty interesting and different from currently typical Deep Learning models.


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I don't know if you are looking for something in a library, but I've found this in a public Github (I've not checked deeply if it fits for you). I hope that's what you're looking for.


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