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Human intelligence is very general / broad in its scope. This is self-evident, and whatever AI ends up to be, we'd like it to be a general problem solver as well (cf. Simon and Newell). Taking liberal interpretations of your question... Why AI in a computer? Computers, to the extent that we can frame problems in general as a solvable computational ...


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I don’t think AI is simulating the brain functions and not even close. Do you know how the nervous system work? How the neutrons transmit signals with action potential? Pathway analysis? Splicing junctions? AI is not about simulating the brain at all. We don’t simulate the biology pathway, we don’t simulate alternative splicing, we don’t have proteins in ...


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For what its worth (and having done a bit of study on this and being really interested in the topic): the answer seems to go back to the beginnings of AI and even earlier (Turing's 1936 paper in which he introduces what's now called the Turing machine). John McCarthy's filer for the 1956 Dartmouth College summer workshop on "Artificial Intelligence" (...


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I think a worthwhile extension of this line of thought is "why not both?" I do not believe there is anything preventing approaching the problem from both sides at once. There is a great deal of research on both sides (biological research and computational research), but considerably less on the integration of the two (although there certainly is some, such ...


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There are a number of reasons why a simulated brain might be better than creating a real brain. One reason is computers can live indefinitely (kind of). Brains may not be able to live forever and there might not be a way to transfer information from one brain to another. One of the principle advantages of a computer then is that it could have more experience ...


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