1
$\begingroup$

Is it possible to get the source code for a research paper?

In particular, I want to see the source for this paper https://arxiv.org/abs/2304.03442

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ ArxIv has a code section (see tabs below summary), and it will be populated if the author or someone else has linked it. There is nothing for this paper specifically right now. The wording of your question title is not clear - Yes it is possible to get the source code for a paper, if it is published and one of the ways to find it will be on the Arxiv code tab. However, I think if I gave that answer you would not want it. So please update the question to be specific to your needs. $\endgroup$ Jun 27, 2023 at 15:56

2 Answers 2

1
$\begingroup$

Generally speaking authors sometimes add a link to an official implementation of their code in their papers or in the Arxiv code section.

Otherwise it is worthwile to check out this website https://paperswithcode.com or do a search with the papers name on github.

For your specific paper I did not find an implementation on paperswithcode, but on GitHub there are plenty of unofficial implementations. https://github.com/search?q=Generative%20Agents%3A%20Interactive%20Simulacra%20of%20Human%20Behavior&type=repositories

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Yes, it is possible if the authors share it.

As an example if found a repo on Git Hub just by searching the name in Google: https://github.com/mkturkcan/generative-agents. Note that this could be made by others and not the authors

I will recommend a few things that I use to find scripts used in papers.

  1. Search the name of the paper in Google and find additional webs, tweets, posts, or any additional information that the authors could share on social networks.
  2. Write to the corresponding author of the paper. Usually, at least one author shares their email.
  3. Take into account that white papers such as the most published in Arxiv are waiting for decisions in journals therefore to avoid someone stealing their idea, they don't share the code until the paper is published.
$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ The linked code is clearly not the implementation in the paper from the question, nor by the original authors, and the readme says so. However, it is an attempted implementation based on the paper. $\endgroup$ Jun 27, 2023 at 18:50

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .