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Architectures for recognizing and generating emotion are typically somewhat complex and don't generally have short descriptions, so it's probably better to reference the literature rather than give a misleading soundbite: Some of the early work in affective computing was done by Rosalind W. Picard. There is a research group at MIT specializing in this area. ...


6

I think your question fits nowadays more in the field of Human-Robot Interaction, which relies largely on vision for recognition of gestures and follow movements, as well as soft, natural movements as a response. Note that the movements of the face and hands belong to the most complex tasks, involving many muscles at a time. I strongly recommend the film ...


5

Will computers be able to understand user emotions? The term Understand is multidimensional, so characterizing the degree of understanding — emotional or otherwise — is a slippery task. Nonetheless, some forms of AI emotional understanding are possible. An Interesting Simple Case Even the embedded programs of velocity sensitive musical ...


4

It's a poorly stated question because these are at least three, possibly four different questions that are quite independent from each other. First, let's take the questions from the text. Selfishness vs generosity of the system - this is quite easy to define as sacrificing resources for "own maintenance" vs "statutory purposes" - "helping others" defined ...


3

First, a note on the question itself. Humans have been endowed with personalities by nature, and it is not clear (to me at least) if this is a feature or a bug. In my opinion, this is a statement that constrains the question, since it assumes that the personality is given. To me, it feels a bit like playing god: Artificial (given) Intelligence would ...


3

'Personality' is something of a 'suitcase word' (Minsky) for quite a large collection of (presumably reasonably consistent) observable traits. It seems clear that there is a certain collective advantage in having a consistent personality - specifically that it affords observers some learning gradient in an otherwise uncertain environment. This is of ...


3

Emotions aren't something that you can implement - they're very complex. However, you can attempt to mimic them. Human emotions are closely related to conscious experience characterized by intense mental activity, which is based on interpretation of events. Recent brain studies (including research in cognitive psychology and neurophysiology) suggests that ...


2

MOEAs sounds very cool, but I feel that you can't really talk about conflict in AI without discussing generative adversarial networks (GANs), which have been shown to have amazing performance by training a model to say detect in-between pictures of cats and dogs and an adversarial network being trained to create pictures to attempt to trick the training ...


2

There are multi-objective optimization problems, where the objective functions may be in conflict with each other, which can potentially have multiple Pareto-optimal solutions. The paper Multi-objective optimization using genetic algorithms: A tutorial (2006) gives a good overview of the multi-objective optimization problem with genetic algorithms, which can ...


2

Yes, there is research on this topic. The field that studies it is known as affective computing (AC). Emotion recognition seems to be a specific problem in affective computing, i.e. the recognition of emotions, while AC is also concerned with giving machines the ability to convey emotions (in fact, this paper differentiates the two). There's also sentiment ...


1

This is a game theory question, and involves the intersection of game theory and ethics. First, it's helpful to define love in functional sense as altruism. (This is consistent with the function aspect of agapein terms of how that love functionally affects the material world through the actions of individuals.) To this end, I urge you to look into the ...


1

I was an Undergraduate Research Scholar - I and my team developed an algorithm to detect Human Emotions from touch Screen - which is under further improvement and development by PHD scholors of my guide . From studying literature I can say that the reverse is a difficult task - Detecting Affect . Even more difficult to detect human emotions with a light ...


1

So you may be familiar with Word2Vec, (W2V) which as Wikipedia describes1 "captures the linguistic contexts of words" using vector arithmetic. For example, subtract 'Paris' from 'France' and add 'Italy' and you get 'Rome'. What you need is something like a Sentiment2Vec (S2V) that captures the similarities between emotional transitions. Something like: ...


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