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To answer this question, first we need to know why developing conscious AI is hard. The main reason is that there is no mathematically or otherwise rigorous definition of consciousness. Sure you have an idea of consciousness as you experience it and we can talk about philosophical zombies but it isn’t a tangible concept that can be broken down and worked ...


12

I'm going to assume that by free will, you mean something like the philosophical concept of libertarian free will, which is defended by philosophers like Robert Kane. In Libertarian Free Will, individuals have some capability to make choices about their actions. The classic way to argue this is by assuming some kind of spirit-stuff (e.g. a soul) that exists ...


11

Artificial consciousness is a challenging theoretical and engineering objective. Once that major challenge is met, the computer's conscious awareness of itself would likely be a minor addition, since the conscious computer is just another object of which its consciousness can be aware. A child can look in the mirror and recognize that moving their hands ...


9

Why in every aspect we are now considering artificial intelligence as a neural network? "We" aren't. It is generally due to reporting by media sources that simplify science and technology news. The definition of AI is somewhat fluid, and also contentious at times, but in research and scientific circles it has not changed to the degree that AI=NN. What has ...


7

What is consciousness? There are some real challenges in setting up consciousness as a goal, because we don't have that much scientific understanding yet of how the brain does it or what balance there needs to be between long-term memory, short-term memory, the implicit work of interpretation, the contrasting conscious modes of automatic processing and ...


5

This is a great question, elements of which I have also been pondering on, though we are very far from being able to actually wrestle with it algorithmically. This question raises all kinds of metaphysical questions (Kant himself showed that pure reason is not sufficient for all questions, but I'm going to avoid that rabbit hole and focus on the mechanics ...


5

It may be helpful to think of consciousness, like intelligence, as a spectrum. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, under the section "Creature Consciousness" (2.1) defines sentience as: Sentience. It may be conscious in the generic sense of simply being a sentient creature, one capable of sensing and responding to its world (Armstrong 1981). Being ...


4

I think this is one of the best AGI related questions I've see in this forum. I will skip all thematic about "what is an AGI", "simulation game", ... These topics have been discussed during decades and nowadays they are, in my opinion, a dead end. Thus, I can only answer with my personal experience: It is a basic theorem in computing that any number of ...


4

Although I’m not sure how an act of freewill could even be described (let alone replicated), Well, one popular definition goes like this: [Free will is] the freedom to act according to one's motives without arbitrary hindrance from other individuals or institutions Source - Wikipedia entry on Compatibilism Note that this definition is perfectly ...


3

I'd call any system that receives input to be "perceiving", and that can constitute a basic definition of "awareness" or even "consciousness", distinct from "self-awareness" or consciousness in the human sense, which we tend to think of in terms of sentience. What the Chinese Room seems to argue is that sentience is based on qualia, which may be difficult ...


3

I think the most important thing is that it has to have time simulated in some way. Think self aware chatbot. Then to be "self aware" the environment could be data that is fed in through time that can be distinguished as being "self" and "other". By that I suppose I mean "self" is the part it influences directly and "other" is the part that is influenced ...


3

There are two main subjects you need to look at to understand the problem: The Turing Test The Turing test, developed by Alan Turing in 1950, is a test of a machine's ability to exhibit intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human. wiki See also: Turing Test (Stanford Philosophical Dictionary) There is a linguistic ...


3

Current limitations in our knowledge mean that the question is not directly answerable: There is no scientific consensus on what consciousness is. Therefore any device designed to "be conscious" is necessarily going to be built on the premise of unsupported, maybe fringe, theory. There is no robust measure of consciousness. If any AI system was built in ...


2

By the cognitive science / psychology literature, we don't have a theory of consciousness, or a measure of sentience. By its very nature, "things" like those can only be understood with respect to ones own subjective experience (as in you can only understand consciousness by comparing it to your own conscious experience). So no, even if we have a device ...


2

"Consciousness" does not have a universal definition. However, if you are really into "consciousness", you should probably read about Searle's Chinese Room experiment or Marvin Minsky's society of mind. In my opinion, there are many more fundamental obstacles in current AI research that we have to tackle first. Furthermore, a more formal question would be ...


2

I think general artificial intelligence will only be possible with some form of self awareness included. Many aspects of human communication do not work if one of the communicating partners does not have self awareness. A good example are many of today's chat bots. They seem to not even hear what they say and only rarely seem to have episodic memory. ...


2

Though a good answer by @pasaba por aqui, I'd agree with @zooby that a graph might be too simplistic. If humans were in an environment where the options were drown or take 5000 unrelated steps to build a boat, we'd never have crossed any seas. I think any graph, if designed by hand, would not be complex enough to call the agent within as general AI. The ...


2

Of the answers so far, the one from @DukeZhou were the most provocative. For instance, the reference to the Chinese Room critique brings up Searle's contention that some form of intentionality might need support in the artificial environment. This might imply the necessity of a value system or a pain-pleasure system, i.e. something where good consequences ...


2

General AI can absolutely exist in a 2D world, just that a generalized AI (defined here as "consistent strength across a set of problems") in this context would still be quite distinct from an Artificial General Intelligence, defined as "an algorithm that can perform any intellectual task that a human can." Even there, the definition of AGI is fuzzy, ...


2

The primary proponent of the singularity is Ray Kurzweil, and his writings permeate the first pages of search results in Google for singularity related search terms. His SEO is probably helped along by the fact that he is the director of research for Google. One person's analysis of former R.K. predictions, The Singularity is Near: How Kurzweil's ...


2

In addition to Jaden's excellent answer "no one is trying to actually make a “conscious” AI because we don’t know what that word means yet" I'd like to add that the word "yet" there is highly optimistic. It's highly problematic and likely impossible to distinguish between a conscious being and a being that behaves exactly as if it was conscious. ...


2

As long as you believe our sentience emerges from our brain that exists in our physical universe, yes, we can build AI that has the same type of sentience (the exact components needed to replicate our minds, e.g. whether software simulations are sufficient or not, can be debated). If you believe our sentience comes from a soul that is outside of our physical ...


2

I think we still have a long way to go before any progress is made on artificial consciousness. However, researchers are taking inspiration from traits of human consciousness. One relevant paper is Machine Theory of Mind by DeepMind. They show that their model can (at least to some extent) represent the desires, beliefs, and intentions of agents that it ...


2

Computational Creativity is not an unassailable challenge (depending on who you talk to;) Philosophers have claimed algorithms can't be creative, but Marcel Duchamp, one of the most significant artists in modernity, famously stated that: "All artists are not chess players, but all chess players are artists" This would seem to have been validated by ...


1

Establishing Names and Terms The mathematician's name is Kurt Gödel, an Austrian-American, and the machine concept named after him is the Gödel machine. The idea of meta-learning (learning how to learn) can be extended recursively to learning how to learn how to learn how to learn and so on. Taking a decision is when the decision is external to the system ...


1

AI is "deterministic" in the sense that it follows exactly the algorithm. "Deterministic" means different things to a data scientist/programmer, but let's not go into details here. There is no "freewill" in AI, it's all about mathematics and algorithms. Don't watch too many scientific movies!


1

Computational Learning Theory gives us an interesting framework to understand what statistical learning is doing. The gist of it is, we can model the process of statistical learning as one of formal deduction. The learning itself does not require a random element. This shouldn't be too surprising. Consider a classic decision tree learner like C4.5 or ID3: ...


1

Yes, a baby can be considered an AI. Will this be our future? I don't know. That is exactly what some people are looking for, to create an AI that can live. We have several AIs that each time more surprises us. But none of them question their own existence, none of them wants to know or require attention from their god (developer) because of their ...


1

considering your current skill-set and experience , it would be better if you work through some courses on neural-networks (cs231n) to get a better idea of state of the art techniques. current research in AGI is still in infancy (or even less). so it would be best if you choose some-more relevant projects , or if you are really into AGI you should ...


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